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NATIONAL THANK YOU NOTE DAY – December 26

NATIONAL THANK YOU NOTE DAY

National Thank You Note Day on December 26th recognized the time-honored tradition of thanking people for their gifts, hospitality and generosity. It is a day to get some note cards, paper, pen, envelopes, and stamps to write those special thank yous.

Taking the time to thank family and friends with a personalized message has special meaning. The receiver of the “thank you” will enjoy getting the card in the mail and the message you have written.
Personal messages also convey to friends and family a deeper, more intimate sentiment. These handwritten notes, however brief, carry a tactile expression of thanks that verbal communication often lacks.

Never underestimate the power of “THANK YOU!”

HOW TO OBSERVE #ThankYouNoteDay

Writing a thank you has become a bit of lost art. We have provided a few tips to help along the way. 

Begin your thank you by acknowledging the specific gift and how thoughtful it is. If the gift was delivered, then assure the sender it arrived safely and how much you enjoy it.  

If the giver presented the gift personally, mention something you remember from your visit. Then thank them for the perfect gift they took the time to bring by describing it and how ideal it is for you.

Close your thank you by gushing about how kind the giver was for remembering you!

Within a few lines, you will have the knack of writing thank you cards. Share your tips using #NationalThankYouNoteDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL THANK YOU NOTE DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar will send a personal thank you note to the founder of this correspondence day when we hear from them. 

There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!


December 26th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

1865

The U.S. Patent Office issued U.S. Patent No. 51741 to James H. Nason Franklin, MA for a coffee percolator.

1963

Beatlemania begins with the release of “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and “I Saw Her Standing There” in the United States. Originally, the songs were to be released in conjunction with their Ed Sullivan Show appearance in early 1964, but their success in the United Kingdom led to the early release in the United States. 

1966

Maulana Karenga, the chair of Black Studies at California State University, Long Beach, celebrates the first Kwanzaa.

1982

For the first time, Time Magazines honors a non-human as The Man of the Year. In fact, it’s not even a living being. The magazine recognizes the personal computer for its annual award.

December 26th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) Birthdays 

George Dewey – 1837

During the Spanish American War, the Commodore of the Asiatic Squadron led an attack in the Battle of Manila Bay in 1898. With only a single casualty and no loss of his ships, Dewey’s already respected reputations grew. In 1903, he was named Admiral of the Navy, the only U.S. sailor to attain the rank.

Charles Pathé – 1863

A pioneer of the French film industry, Pathé founded Pathé Frères of France which grew to be the largest film equipment and production company in the world.

Jean Toomer – 1894

The author and poet is best known for his novel Cane which was published in 1923.

Evelyn Bark – 1900

The British humanitarian earned the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire and became the first woman to receive the Order of St. Michael and St. George. At the outbreak of World War II, Bark joined the British Red Cross and continued to serve her country through a Foreign Relations or Internal Affairs capacity for years beyond the war.

John Walsh – 1945

In 1981, the father of four became a victim rights advocate when his son Adam disappeared and was murdered. John Walsh launched the television shows America’s Most Wanted and The Hunt with John Walsh. He also co-founded the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The database helps law enforcement, families, and missing persons.

Ozzie Smith – 1954

The backflipping “Wizard of Oz” played 18 years in Major League Baseball. In 1978, Smith made a promising start with the San Diego Padres. Then in 1982, the shortstop flipped to the St. Louis Cardinals and earned a World Series Championship. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2002.

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