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NATIONAL MARGARITA DAY – February 22

NATIONAL MARGARITA DAY

National Margarita Day on February 22nd rims a glass with salt and serves up a beverage that tastes like the summer sun.

Known to be the most common tequila-based cocktail served in the United States, the margarita is a cocktail that consists of tequila, triple sec, and lime or lemon juice. A key ingredient is the freshly squeezed lime juice.  In the United States, the most common lime is the thick-skinned Persian lime. When margaritas are made with lemons, they have a much softer taste.

When it comes to sorting out the legends associated with the origin of the margarita, there are many. Two things are certain; the cocktail included tequila, and the bartender edged the rim of the glass with salt. In Mexico, when drinking straight tequila (especially if the quality was bad), the best course of action was to down it in one swallow, suck on a wedge of lime and lick a dash of salt off the back of your hand.

It makes sense that the salt followed the lime and the tequila to the margarita glass. Today, lime is not the only flavor of margarita, and the specialists behind the bar have gotten creative mixing dried herbs, infused sugars, and exotic salts to enhance both the presentation of the glass and the flavor of the cocktail. 

Margaritas can be served on the rocks (shaken with ice), frozen (blended with ice), or straight up (without ice).

Legends

There are many different stories and myths, beginning as early as 1938, as to how and when the margarita was created.

In the December 1953 issue of Esquire magazine, the margarita cocktail was the “Drink of the Month.”  The recipe as printed was:

  • 1 ounce tequila
  • Dash of Triple Sec
  • Juice of 1/2 lime or lemon

Pour over crushed ice, stir.  Rub the rim of a stem glass with a rind of lemon or lime, spin in salt—pour, and sip.  (Wikipedia)

The margarita was further popularized with the 1977 release of Jimmy Buffett’s song “Margaritaville.”

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalMargaritaDay

Mix up a margarita at home or as your favorite bartender to make you one. What’s your favorite flavor? Find your Margarita Day deals by visiting our Celebration Deals page. 

Let us know using #NationalMargaritaDay to post on social media. Remember, always drink responsibly and never drink and drive.

NATIONAL MARGARITA DAY HISTORY

National Margarita Day is claimed to have been founded by a few dozen bartenders, so it’s hard to trace its exact origin.


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February 22nd Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

1879

Just like inventors, businesses are trial and error. Frank Woolworth learned that soon after he opened his first 5 Cent Store in Utica, New York on this day in 1879. The budding entrepreneur with a vision of customers flocking to his store for the 5 cent items they could afford didn’t give up. He had that Get Up spirit and opened another store in Lancaster, Pennsylvania but added 10 cent items as well. Soon, he expanded, and in 1912 after merging with other retailers, Woolworth & Co stores were in 37 states.

1959

The first Daytona 500 NASCAR race finished in a thrilling dead heat, requiring judges to review video footage to decide the winner. Lee Petty in a’59 Oldsmobile and Johnny Beauchamp in a ’59 Ford Thunderbird crossed the finish line in a photo finish, but there was no technology at the finish line. Three days after the 47,000 spectators went home, judges declared Petty the winner over Beauchamp. in his 1959 Ford Thunderbird.

1980

Known as the Miracle on Ice, the US Men’s Olympic hockey team upset the Soviet Union in a 4-3 win to advance to the final round. Lake Placid, New York, hosted the 1980 Winter Olympics, and in the midst of the Cold War, and a dominant Soviet hockey team, the game was a match the whole world was watching.

1988

The Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance goes to…DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince for “Parents Just Don’t Understand’!! DJ Jazzy Jeff and Will Smith won the first Grammy Award ever presented at the Grammy’s for Rap music.

1997

One sheep, two sheep, three sheep four…zzzzz. Counting sheep earned a whole new meaning when scientists in Scotland at the Roslin Institute announced the first successful birth of a cloned sheep named Dolly.

February 22nd Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) Birthdays

George Washington – 1732

We know him as the first President of the United States. He was a farmer, a revolutionary, a statesman, and a general. In colonial America, Washington was a common man with a grade school education. He had strengths and weaknesses – some apparent and some revealed much later. Washington was born owning slaves and made his conscience known about the practice as he aged.

William Joseph Klem – 1874

“For it’s one, two, three strikes you’re out at the old ball game!” Someone had to call the balls and strikes and one of those people was William Joseph Klem. As a professional umpire in Major League Baseball, Klem pioneered the way the world looked at and treated umpires. He brought a dignity to a profession that was often looked upon as lesser than politicians and they were paid less! The fans in the cheap seats can thank him for the hand signals that let you know the call, whether you like it or not. After 37 years as an umpire, Klem left a lasting impression on the sport that is still felt today.

Zitkala-Sa – 1876

She was not only a woman of many names but also one of many cultures and it was her mission to preserve the one most at risk – her Sioux culture. Born Gertrude Simmons, she achieved her mission through many different methods. Zitkala-sa wrote articles, essays, short stories, and books; she was an educator and collaborated with William F. Hanson on the first opera by a Native American – The Sun Dance. In 1926, Zitkala-sa founded the National Council of American Indians.

Robert Wadlow – 1918

He was larger than life but only lived to the age of 22. In those short years, Wadlow grew to 8-feet 11 inches tall, and at the age of 19, he became the world’s tallest man at 8-feet, 4 inches tall. Wadlow died in 1940, but he’s still the tallest man who ever lived.

Michael Chang – 1950

Wins are important celebrations. For Michael Chang, winning the 1989 French Open was significant. Defeating Stefan Edberg was the pinnacle of the day and the major celebration. However, the cherry on top was the fact that Chang was the youngest player to ever win the title.

Edward Gorey – 1925

If Edward Gorey’s surname evokes surreal images and dark tales, then his name is fitting. The German illustrator and author was known for his macabre work in the mid-20th century. Some of his works include The Beastly Baby, The Gashleycumb Tinies, and The Doubtful Guest.

Notable Mentions

Horace Pippin – 1888
Edna St. Vincent Millay – 1892
Julie Walters – 1950
Julius Erving – 1950
Steve Irwin – 1962
Drew Barrymore – 1975

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