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NOVEMBER 4, 2018 | NATIONAL CHICKEN LADY DAY | NATIONAL CANDY DAY | DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS

NATIONAL CHICKEN LADY DAY

National Chicken Lady Day on November 4 annually honors Dr. Marthenia “Tina” Dupree.  For 12 years, Dr. Dupree worked for the second largest chicken restaurant in the world as the Director of Community Relations and Training. She was widely known due to her work in the community. During this time and through her work with the community and the people she helped,  Dr. Dupree became known as “The Chicken Lady”.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #ChickenLadyDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

For more than two decades, Dr. Dupree helped to teach, train and certify hundreds of professional speakers, authors and trainers. In 2001, National Chicken Lady Day was created as a way of saying “thank you” to Dr. Dupree.  She is thanked not only by those she directly affected over the years but by those who continue to feel her positive impact years later as a result of her experience, knowledge and the relationships she built.

NATIONAL CANDY DAY

National Candy Day is observed annually on November 4th. Candies come in numerous colors, shapes, sizes and varieties and have a long history in popular culture.

It was in the late 13th century that the Middle English word candy began to be used, coming into English from the Old French cucre candi, derived in turn from Persian Qand and Qandi, cane sugar.

People use the term candy as a broad category that includes candy bars, chocolates, licorice, sour candies, salty candies, tart candies, hard candies, taffies, gumdrops, marshmallows and much more.

Way back in time, before sugar was readily available, candy was made from honey.  The honey was used to coat fruits and flowers to preserve them or to create forms of candy.  There is still candy that is served in this way today, but it is typically seen as a garnish.

Originally a form of medicine, candy calmed the digestive system or cooled a sore throat.  At this time, combined with spices and sugar, candy only appeared in the purses and the dishes of the wealthy.

It was in the 18th century that the first candy is believed to have come to America from Britain and France.  At this time, the simplest form of candy was Rock Candy made from crystallized sugar. However, even the basic form of sugar was considered a luxury and was only attainable by the wealthy.

Since 1979, the world has produced more sugar than can be sold, making it very attainable and cheap. 

When the technological advances and the availability of sugar opened up the market in the 1830s, the candy business underwent a drastic change.  Candy was not only for the enjoyment of the well to do but the pleasure of everyone.  Penny candies became popular, targeting children.

  • 1847 – Invention of the candy press making it possible to produce multiple shapes and sizes of candy at one time.
  • 1851 – Confectioners began using a revolving steam pan to assist in boiling sugar.

The two top-selling candies in America have been: 

  • M & M’S — M&M’s are milk chocolate drops with a colorful candy coating on the outside. The candies were first manufactured in 1941 and were given to American soldiers serving in the Second World War. M&M’s are produced by Mars Inc.
  • Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups — Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups are round chocolate disks that are filled with a sweet, creamy peanut butter filling. The cups were first manufactured in 1928 by the Hershey’s company.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Grab a pack of your favorite candy and enjoy. Use #NationalCandyDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of National Candy Day.

DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS

Daylight Saving Time Ends is on the first Sunday in November at 2:00 AM.

Daylight saving time (DST) or summer time is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that people get up earlier in the morning and experience more daylight in the evening. Typically, users of DST adjust clocks forward one hour near the start of spring and change them backward in the autumn.

The practice has received both advocacy and criticism.  Putting clocks forward benefits retail business, sports, and other activities that exploit sunlight after working hours, but can cause problems for evening entertainment and other activities tied to the sun (such as farming) or darkness (such as fireworks shows).  Although some early proponents of DST aimed to reduce evening use of incandescent lighting (formerly a primary use of electricity, modern heating and cooling), usage patterns differ greatly, and research about how DST currently affects energy use is limited or contradictory.

Problems sometimes caused by DST clock shifts include: they complicate timekeeping, and can disrupt meetings, travel, billing, record keeping, medical devices, heavy equipment, and sleep patterns. Software can often adjust computer clocks automatically, but this can be limited and error-prone, particularly when various jurisdictions change the dates and timings of DST changes.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Make sure to turn back your clocks. Use #DaylightSavingTimeEnds or #FallBack to post on social media.

HISTORY

The New Zealander George Vernon Hudson proposed the modern idea of daylight saving in 1895.  Germany and Austria-Hungary organized the first implementation, starting on 30 April 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the energy crisis of the 1970s.

On Deck for November 5, 2018

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar™ is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months.  In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.
 
Whether you want to celebrate your favorite mail carrier and flip flops, share your joy for bacon and chocolate cake or enjoy popcorn (our office favorite) on National Popcorn Day, stay in-the-know by signing-up for our e-mail updates, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Don’t find yourself unprepared on Talk Like a Pirate Day or Answer the Phone Like Buddy the Elf Day – join us as we #CelebrateEveryDay!

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