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NATIONAL IRISH COFFEE DAY – January 25

National Irish Coffee Day - January 25

NATIONAL IRISH COFFEE DAY

Made with strong coffee, Irish whiskey, sugar and topped with a rich layer of cream, Irish coffee is recognized on January 25.

On a cold, wet day in 1942 weary travelers to the small Shannon Airport in southwest Ireland found their way to a restaurant and chef Joe Sheridan. To warm his guests, he served them hot coffee, spiked with whiskey and topped with whipped cream. The passengers asked if the beverage was Brazilian coffee. Sheridan responded that it was Irish coffee.

A travel writer, Stanton Delaplane, brought Irish coffee to the United States after having it at Shannon Airport.

Delaplane brought the idea to the Buena Vista Cafe on November 10, 1952. After much trial and error, sampling and a trip back to Ireland for a taste of the original, Delaplane along with Buena Vista owners Jack Koeppler and George Freeberg were able to replicate the delicious coffee and the method for floating the cream on top of the coffee.

How to Make an Authentic Irish Coffee

Starting with a warm glass, fill 2/3rds full of freshly brewed coffee. Stir in a heaping teaspoon of sugar.  Add 1 ounce of Irish whiskey.

Adding the cream so it floats is the tricky part. According to the Buena Vista account, and at the suggestion of San Francisco’s mayor, a dairyman, cream that is 48 hours old, is best. However, others recommend whipping cream (not whipped cream) that has been lightly whipped or foamed.

When the coffee has stopped swirling from stirring in the sugar, pour the foamy cream over the back of a spoon.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Warm up with an Irish coffee.  Use #NationalIrishCoffeeDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of  National Irish Coffee Day.

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