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NATIONAL CHEESECAKE DAY - July 30

NATIONAL CHEESECAKE DAY

National Cheesecake Day on July 30th offers a slice of one of America’s favorite desserts. Order up a cheesecake with your favorite topping. Get it delivered or make it at home.

This smooth dessert hits the spot when the end of the meal rolls around. While most cakes have a crumb, cheesecake’s texture is nothing like cake. Indeed, its creamy, thick pudding-like character comes from the soft cheese used as the main ingredient. Depending on the recipe, either cream cheese or cottage cheese is used. When the cheese is mixed with sugar, eggs, and other ingredients, the batter is added to a crust.

When making cheesecake, one of the most common crusts used is a graham cracker crust. Other options include a cookie crust, pastry or sponge cake. However, some cheesecakes are crustless. Recipes vary and cheesecakes may be prepared baked or unbaked.

When faced with choosing a cheesecake flavor, don’t panic. While the options may seem overwhelming, bakers solved this problem. They offer a variety of flavors in one cake. So, take one home and try each one. Since cheesecakes do come in a wide variety, consider your tastes. If you prefer summer fruits and berries, cheesecakes have you covered. Tropical options hit the spot, too. For coffee lovers, bakers provide a rich selection. And don’t forget delicious chocolate and nutty flavors. Each cheesecake may be served with fresh fruit, a sauce, whipped cream or plain. 

History of the Cheesecake

When it comes to searching for cheesecake’s history, we look to ancient Greece. A form of the dessert comes up as a recipe served to athletes. It has been found that the earliest attested mention of a cheesecake is by Greek physician Aegimus, who wrote a book on the art of making cheesecakes.

James Kraft developed a form of pasteurized cream cheese in 1912. In 1928, Kraft acquired the Philadelphia trademark and marketed pasteurized Philadelphia Cream Cheese. Today, cheesecake makers use this brand more than any other. 

History of the Cheesecake

When it comes to searching for cheesecake’s history, we look to ancient Greece. A form of the dessert comes up as recipe served to athletes. It has been found that the earliest attested mention of a cheesecake is by Greek physician Aegimus, who wrote a book on the art of making cheesecakes.

James Kraft developed a form of pasteurized cream cheese in 1912. In 1928, Kraft acquired the Philadelphia trademark and marketed pasteurized Philadelphia Cream Cheese. Today, cheesecake makers use this brand more than any other. 

Styles of Cheesecakes:
  • New York-style cheesecake
  • Pennsylvania Dutch-style cheesecake
  • Philadelphia-style
  • Farmer cheese cheesecake
  • Country-style cheesecake
  • Lactose-free cheesecake
  • Cheesecake Kludys
  • Chicago Style cheesecake
  • Savory cheesecake

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalCheesecakeDay

Whether you make one at home or pick one up at a bakery, savor the creamy taste of cheesecake! We even have a New York Cheesecake recipe for you to try. And here’s another recipe, too! Post on social media using #NationalCheesecakeDay and share your favorite variety.

Are you looking for the latest cheesecake deals? We’ve got ’em! Check out the Celebration Deals page for all you offer updates. If you have a deal, be sure to let us know and we’ll get it added. Use the Contact Us link found at the bottom of every page.

NATIONAL CHEESECAKE DAY HISTORY

We were unable to find the creator and the origin of National Cheesecake Day.


There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

On This Day in History
  • 1729 Baltimore, Maryland was founded

The great port city along the Patapsco River was central to the Revolutionary War. Named after 1st Baron Baltimore, Baltimore’s first colonial governor was the baron’s second son, Leonard Calvert. Not only was the great city home to poet Edgar Allan Poe, but others like Thurgood Marshall and Babe Ruth also called it home. Baltimore served as the backdrop for the battle that inspired the Star-Spangled Banner, too.

  • 1932 – Disney’s Flowers and Trees

Premiering at Grauman’s Chinese Theater, Walt Disney’s first technicolor short film, Flowers and Trees, later earned a nod from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

  • 1956 – United States Motto

“In God We Trust” replaces “E Pluribus Unum” as the motto of the United States. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the measure into law. While E Pluribus Unum still appears on many U.S. coins and paper bills today, it had been the country’s unofficial motto since 1776. The phrases began appearing together on coins as early as 1861. However, the phrases appeared off and on until 1908 when In God We Trust became a permanent fixture on coins. In 1955, Congress approved adding the phrase to paper money, too.

  • 1962 – Trans-Canada Highway

At 7821 kilometers (4860 miles), the longest national highway in the world opens. Called the Trans-Canada Highway, it begins at Douglas Street and Dallas Road in Victoria, British Columbia, and terminates at St. Johns in Newfoundland and Labrador.

  • 1971 – Lunar Rover

Apollo 15 made history when the first lunar rover (also known as a moon buggy) landed on the moon. The next day, Astronauts David Scott and James Irwin became the first humans to drive on the lunar surface.

  • 2003 – Volkswagen Beetle

Marking the end of an era, the last original style Volkswagen Beetle rolls off the assembly line in Mexico.

Born on this Day
  • Emily Bronte – 1818

Best known for her novel Wuthering Heights, this author’s sisters also published their writings.

  • Henry Ford – 1863 

Founder of the Ford Motor Company, Ford was also instrumental in changing the face of manufacturing with the assembly line.

  • Bud Selig – 1934

Serving as the 9th commission of Major League Baseball for 16 years, Selig saw the league through strikes and expansion.

  • Arnold Schwarzenegger – 1947

As an actor, Arnold Schwarzenegger is best known for his roles in the Terminator franchise. He was also a successful bodybuilder and the 38th Governor of California.

  • Delta Burke – 1956

Best known as Suzanne Sugarbaker in the television comedy I, Burke went on to become a director and author.

  • Laurence Fishburne – 1961

Fishburne’s success can be found both on the big and silver screens. His versatile roles in hit dramas and the Maxtrix series also earned him awards on stage and screen.

  • Alton Brown – 1962 

Best known for his cooking series on the Food Network and the Cooking Channel, Brown challenges amateur and professional chefs alike.

  • Joe Daley – 1918 

A graduate of The High School of Music & Art and Manhattan School of music, Daley went on to both educate other musicians and also play with numerous Jazz ensembles.

  • Paul Anka – 1941

The singer-songwriter hails from Canada and is known for hit songs such as “Put Your Head on My Shoulder” and “She’s Having My Baby.”

  • Anita Hill – 1956

An attorney turned educator, Hill is a professor at Brandeis University. During her career with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, she worked with Clarence Thomas. During Thomas’ confirmation hearing, a private interview with Hill concerning allegations of sexual harassment surfaced.

  • Bill Cartwright – 1957

As a center for the New York Knicks and the Chicago Bulls, Cartwright went on to lead the Bulls as their head coach.

  • Diva Zappa – 1979

The youngest daughter of guitarist and composer Frank Zappa and Gail Zappa, Diva went on to become an artist and actress.

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