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Where the World Gathers to Celebrate Every Day

JUNE 7, 2019 | NATIONAL DOUGHNUT DAY | NATIONAL BOONE DAY | NATIONAL CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM DAY | NATIONAL VCR DAY | NATIONAL OKLAHOMA DAY

NATIONAL DOUGHNUT DAY – First Friday in June

NATIONAL DOUGHNUT (DONUT) DAY

Each year on the first Friday in June, people participate in National Doughnut or Donut Day.  This day celebrates the doughnut and honors the Salvation Army Lassies, the women that served doughnuts to soldiers during WWI.

In 1917, the original “Salvation Army Doughnut” was first served by the ladies of the Salvation Army.  It was during WWI that the Salvation Army Lassies went to the front lines of Europe.  Home cooked foods, provided by these brave volunteers, were a morale boost to the troops.

The doughnuts were often cooked in oil inside the metal helmets of American soldiers.  American infantrymen were then commonly called “doughboys.”  A more standard spelling is donut.

Salvation Army truck sitting in front of Bearscat Bakehouse in Bismarck, ND.

Salvation Army truck sitting in front of Bearscat Bakehouse in Bismarck, ND.

On this day, many bakeries and coffee shops in the United States offer doughnut deals to their customers.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Celebrate the day by enjoying your favorite doughnut.  Use #NationalDonutDay or #NationalDoughnutDay when using social media.

HISTORY

National Doughnut Day was created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor the women who served the doughnuts to soldiers in World War I.  This day began as a fund-raiser for Chicago’s Salvation Army.  The goal of their 1938 fund-raiser was to help the needy during the Great Depression.

Doughnut (Donut) Day Deals

Doughnut Day Deals

Looking for a great deal on donuts for National Doughnut Day?  Look no further as we have them listed below.

Celebrated annually on the first Friday in June, the day of the pastry was established in 1938 to honor the Salvation Army Donut Lassies, women who served the treats to soldiers during World War I.

Duck Donuts: This chain originated in Duck, a town on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. It has West Coast stores in Huntington Beach and Irvine. It will be giving away one “bare,” powdered or cinnamon sugar doughnut per customer at participating locations on Friday. No purchase necessary, according to a news release. Duck Donuts

Dunkin’: The offer is one free classic doughnut with every beverage purchase, according to the chain’s website, dunkindonuts.com.

Krispy Kreme: Visit a participating shop and get a free doughnut of your choice. The chain is challenging America to help it give away 1 million free doughnuts on Friday. Just If it reaches the goal, it will have a second giveaway sometime in June for a new flavor it says will be “out-of-this-world great.” krispykreme.com

National Boone Day - June 7

NATIONAL BOONE DAY

National Boone Day, observed each year on June 7, commemorates the day frontiersman Daniel Boone (November 2, 1734 – September 26, 1820) first began exploring the valleys and forests of the present day Bluegrass State of Kentucky on June 7, 1769.  Boone founded the village of Boonesborough, Kentucky which is one of the first American settlements west of the Appalachians.

Daniel Boone, an American pioneer, explorer, and frontiersman, was born on November 2, 1734. His frontier exploits made him one of United States first folk heroes. By the end of the 18th century, following the route marked by Boone, more than 200,000 European people had migrated to Kentucky/Virginia.

Daniel Boone married Rebecca Bryan on August 14, 1756. They lived in a cabin on his father’s farm and had ten children. He supported his family as a market hunter, collecting pelts for the fur trade.

During the Revolutionary War, Boone was a militia officer and in 1778 was captured by the Shawnee warriors who adopted him into their tribe. He later left the Indians, returning to Boonesborough to help defend the European settlements in Kentucky/Virginia.

Following the war, Daniel Boone emigrated to eastern Missouri where he spent most of the last two decades of his life. Boone died of natural causes on September 26, 1820, at the age of 85. His last words were, “I’m going now, my time has come.”

Many places in the United States are named after Daniel Boone including the Daniel Boone National Forest, the Sheltowee Trace Trail, the town of Boone, North Carolina, and seven different counties. Schools are also named after Boone, including locations in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Chicago.

A legend in his lifetime, Boone remains an iconic figure in American history.

HOW TO OBSERVE

How much do you know about Daniel Boone?  Is it folklore or historical fact? Explore the history books, museums and historical sites in the places he lived and on the trails he blazed to find out. Use #NationalBooneDay to share on social media.

HISTORY

The Kentucky Historical Society founded Boone Day over 140 years ago and the day is still going strong.

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM DAY – June 7

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM DAY

To observe National Chocolate Ice Cream Day on June 7 all you need is chocolate ice cream.  Who says you have to stop there, though? You can have it in a cone or make it from scratch.  Add sprinkles or syrup or whipped cream. 

Chocolate ice cream is the second most common flavor, surpassed only by vanilla.  The chocolate flavored ice cream has been in existence well over a hundred years and has been popular in the United States since the late 19th century.

Cocoa powder is blended in with eggs, cream, vanilla and sugar to make chocolate ice cream.  The cocoa powder is what gives the ice cream a brown color.  Other flavors, such as rocky road or triple chocolate chunk, use chocolate ice cream in their creation.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Try this chocolate ice cream recipe and a chocolate milkshake recipe. Use #ChocolateIceCreamDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of National Chocolate Ice Cream Day.

NATIONAL VCR DAY – June 7

NATIONAL VCR DAY 

National VCR Day is observed annually on June 7th.  Do you still own a VCR player or do you know someone who does? Many young people do not know what a VCR player or a VCR tape is.  National VCR Day is dedicated to the video cassette recorder (VCR). In their time, they were a marvel of technology!

The video cassette recorder is an electro-mechanical device that records analog audio and analog video from television on a removable, magnetic tape videocassette.  The images and sound can then be played back at a more convenient time. At the time, the VCR was the main way to watch movies at home, and one could create their own personal movie library.

The first video cassette recorder was introduced in 1956.  The home video cassette format (VCR) was developed in 1970. 

The birth of VCR mass market success boomed in the mid-1970s and continued throughout the 1980s and 1990s.

Over 10 billion videotapes remain today with our recorded memories.  These memories are keepsakes and people keep the tapes for that reason.  It is important to move those memories to a more stable format to preserve them.  Companies like Zoovio, Inc., provide options for both getting them converted to a DVD or stored in an online private vault online to be viewed and shared on internet connected devices including TVs.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #NationalVCRDay to post on social media. And check out Zoovio to digitalize your old VCR cassettes of family memories and preserve those memories on the web with your very own online video vault!

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator and origin of National VCR Day.

National Oklahoma Day - June 7

NATIONAL OKLAHOMA DAY

National Oklahoma Day on June 7 recognizes the 46th state to be granted statehood.

The panhandled state of Oklahoma is a dotted series of granite mountain peaks, sloping sandstone ridges, rolling hills, and plains. In 1803, the land became part of the United States through the Louisiana Purchase.

Across the state, significant sites record the result of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail crosses nine states and describes the brutal impact on the lives of Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks, and Seminoles.

In 1889, several counties in Oklahoma became open to settlement by Land Run. Settlers could claim quarter sections of land only after a specific time (usually noon) on a set date. Some eager settlers would cross the boundary into the county seeking their preferred quarter section sooner than the stroke of noon, earning them (and the state) the nickname “Sooners.”

From the Arkansas River to the Neosho River, Oklahoma has scenic views, lakes and mountain trails. Put on your hiking boots and make some trail mix for an afternoon adventure. After a good hike, take in Route 66 for a drive and maybe pick up some barbeque or something fried.  Oklahomans seem to have cornered the market on nearly everything fried. To mention a few, we came across fried okra and lamb balls and catfish. For something fresh, don’t forget the state fruit. Strawberries!

HOW TO OBSERVE

Join National Day Calendar as we celebrate National Oklahoma Day. We’ll take a drive out on the open highway, and work up an appetite. Discover the best eateries in the state and explore the history that goes with them. Find adventure in The Sooner State and use #NationalOklahomaDay to share on social media.

In 2017, National Day Calendar® began celebrating each state in the order they entered the union starting the week of Independence Day and ending with Hawaii. We highlight a small part of each states’ history, foods and the people who make up the state. Many states have their own state celebrations, and National Day Calendar’s observances in no way replace them. There’s so much more to explore, we can’t help but celebrate our beautiful country even more!

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar™ is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months.  In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.
 
Whether you want to celebrate your favorite mail carrier and flip flops, share your joy for bacon and chocolate cake or enjoy popcorn (our office favorite) on National Popcorn Day, stay in-the-know by signing-up for our e-mail updates, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Don’t find yourself unprepared on Talk Like a Pirate Day or Answer the Phone Like Buddy the Elf Day – join us as we #CelebrateEveryDay!

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