Health

ESOPHAGEAL CANCER AWARENESS MONTH - April

Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month - April

ESOPHAGEAL CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Across the United States, esophageal cancer is a growing concern. That’s why April is designated Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month.

The esophagus is the tube that runs from the throat to the stomach. It consists of muscle and tissues that allow swallowing of food and liquids.

According to the American Cancer Society, esophageal cancer is the seventh leading cancer killer among men. And while deaths due to esophageal cancer are down, the numbers of people being diagnosed are increasing. Survival rates are increasing, too, though they are still comparatively low. Men are more likely than women to be diagnosed with esophageal cancer,

As with many cancers, early detection improves survival rates. Some of the symptoms of esophageal cancer include:

  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Pressure, burning or pain in the chest
  • Increased heartburn or indigestion
  • Cough
  • Hoarse voice

There are several risk factors to keep in mind, too.

  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Obesity
  • Alcohol use
  • Bile reflux
  • Barrett’s esophagus
  • Achalasia
  • Tobacco use
  • Low fiber diet
  • Sedentary lifestyle

Several of the risk factors are in our control, though others are not. Speak with your doctor about changing those factors you can control and how to address the ones you can’t. If you’re experiencing symptoms, don’t wait. Schedule an appointment with your doctor today.

HOW TO OBSERVE #EsophagealCancerAwarenessMonth

  • Learn more about esophageal cancers.
  • Host a fundraiser in support of research and treatments.
  • Know your risk factors and speak with your doctor.
  • Make lifestyle changes to reduce your risk.
  • Support someone living with esophageal cancer.
  • Wear a periwinkle ribbon to help raise awareness.
  • Use #EsophagealCancerAwarenessMonth on social media.

ESOPHAGEAL CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month was founded to bring increased understanding about the risks and treatments available for this deadly cancer. The organization’s founder, Mindy Mintz Mordecai, lost her husband John to esophageal cancer in 2008.