Where the World Gathers to Celebrate Every Day

NATIONAL PRIME RIB DAY – April 27

NATIONAL PRIME RIB DAY

National Prime Rib Day annually recognizes this special meal favorite on April 27th each year. Sometimes known as the “King of Meats,” Prime Rib is a choice cut from one of the eight prime cuts of beef.

A rubbed-on seasoned and then slow-roasted prime rib will give you a deliciously tender, tasty main course. Find many recipes and helpful “how to cook prime rib” guides on the internet for all to use. Some of the most common seasons used include garlic, salt, pepper, rosemary, onion, oregano, and thyme.

Depending on your preference, you might choose to serve your prime rib with fresh vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, or Brussel sprouts. A variety of potatoes complement prime rib, too. Whether you like mashed, baked, or roasted potatoes, they will pair well with this hearty meal. Add a light salad or pasta dish, too. Don’t forget to serve your favorite wine or beer. Your guests will appreciate it. 

Finish off the meal with a fruit-topped dessert. It’s definitely a meal worthy of a celebration!

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalPrimeRibDay

When prime rib is on the menu, you know it’s time to celebrate! Whether you celebrate at home or visit your favorite restaurant, be sure to invite others to join you. We also have a recipe for you to try. Show off your prime rib skills. We know you have some!

Prime Rib recipe

Share your photos on social media using #NationalPrimeRibDay.

NATIONAL PRIME RIB DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues to research the origins of this tasty holiday.

There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

April 27th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

1865

The worst maritime disaster in United States history occurred on the Mississippi River just north of Marion, Arkansas. Greater than the Titanic disaster, the Sultana steamboat exploded just weeks after the end of the Civil War and the assassination of President Lincoln. Overloaded with POWs returning to the North, over 1800 passengers perished.

1937

After premieres in Los Angeles and New York, A Star is Born opens across the United States. Starring Janet Gaynor and Fredric March, the film follows a young woman’s dream of Hollywood stardom. The film’s popularity lends itself to four remakes. The first, a television adaptation, starred Kathleen Crowley and Conrad Nagel. Then in 1954, crooner Judy Garland and James Mason put on performances that many consider to be unstoppable. Some even suggest that Garland’s performance is the best of her career. Then in 1976, Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson take up the challenge. Garland, Mason, Streisand and Kristofferson all won Golden Globes for their performances. The most recent version of a Star is Born came out in 2018 starring Grammy winner Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper. The film won the Grammy for Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media.

1947

In the House that Ruth Built, 58,339 fans turn out to honor an ailing Babe Ruth.

April 27th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) Birthdays

Ulysses S. Grant – 1822

The 18th president of the United States served as the commanding general of the Union Armies during the American Civil War. The youngest president the country had seen, his two terms from 1869 to 1877 placed him in charge of overseeing much of Reconstruction.

W.H. Carothers – 1896

W.H. Carothers invented nylon and neoprene. As a chemist, his contributions led to breakthroughs led to multiple versatile uses in industry and manufacturing.

Betty Mae Tiger – 1923

Betty Mae Tiger Jumper devoted her entire career to public service. As a nurse, she worked to improve the health and conditions in the Seminole community. In 1967, Tiger Jumper was elected the first woman tribal leader of the Florida Seminoles and the first woman to lead a federally recognized tribe. In 1971, she left office to carry on the publishing of the Seminole Tribune which Tiger Jumper launched in 1950.

Coretta Scott King – 1927

During the Civil Rights Movement, Coretta Scott King worked alongside Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Following his death, she earned a reputation as a leader in her own right.

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