Faith

BROTHERHOOD/SISTERHOOD WEEK - Third Week in Feburary

Brotherhood/Sisterhood Week - Third Week in February

BROTHERHOOD/SISTERHOOD WEEK

The third week in February is Brotherhood/Sisterhood week. The week encourages people of diverse faiths to discuss not only our differences but also to recognize how we are all the same—uniting in our human brotherhood and sisterhood.

To be one, to be united is a great thing. But to respect the right to be different is maybe even greater. ~ Bono

The week honors and celebrates our differences. While people of different backgrounds and faiths come together, they also reaffirm a commitment to eliminate racial and religious prejudice. Throughout the week, organizations host events across the country supporting men and women of all ages in the pursuit of this goal.

HOW TO OBSERVE #BrotherhoodSisterhoodWeek

There are several ways to participate in this week-long event.

  • Find a local event near you or organize one through your congregation or community service group.
  • Attend a webinar about diversity and mending divisions.
  • Plan a food drive to enhance the concept of caring for others. Share the bounty with the local food pantry.
  • Invite someone of a different race, ethnicity, or religion to a potluck dinner, sharing each other’s foods.

Share your ideas using #BrotherhoodSisterhoodWeek to share on social media.

BROTHERHOOD/SISTERHOOD WEEK HISTORY

President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed Brotherhood Week in 1934. It later became known as Brotherhood/Sisterhood Week.

The concept came about through efforts of the newly formed National Conference of Christians and Jews (now the National Conference for Community and Justice). They were driven to counter the sectarian sentiments of many Americans in the 1920s. The prominent social activist founders of the organization encouraged the President to proclaim the week as an official event.

Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much. ~ Helen Keller

They hoped to set aside one week each year to encourage people of all faiths to meet together to discuss their differences and to reaffirm the brotherhood that crosses religious belief systems.