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Where the World Gathers to Celebrate Every Day

AUGUST 11, 2019 | NATIONAL SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S DAY | NATIONAL SPIRIT OF ’45 DAY | NATIONAL PRESIDENTIAL JOKE DAY | NATIONAL RASPBERRY BOMBE DAY

National Son's and Daughter's Day - August 11

NATIONAL SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S DAY

National Son’s and Daughter’s Day on August 11 brings parents and their children together for quality time.  On this day, be with the joys of your life.

Let your children know that you are glad they are part of your life.  While listening to the events of their day, share family stories. Find out about their hopes and dreams. Learn what inspires them.  Teach them something new, or maybe there’s something they can teach you. Enjoy every day you have with them and spend as much quality time as you can. 

Time with our children can be fleeting. Not only do they grow quickly, but their interests and needs change, too. Whether we realize it or not, sons and daughters look up to us. They emulate our behavior – the good and the bad. As much as times change, children don’t. We craved our parent’s approval and acceptance. Our children do, too.

Every child is different. Their personalities uniquely fitted to them. While one child devours books, another may deconstruct every electronic device in the house. The chatterbox keeps us awake on long road trips and the night owl keeps us alert to everything under the stars. No two are the same. That’s exactly how it’s supposed to be. Celebrate them and the parts they play in your family.

HOW TO OBSERVE #SonsAndDaughtersDay

Do something special for your children today.  If they are at home, go for a walk, or enjoy a local park.  If your children are grown, give them a call and remind them how special they are to you.  Use #SonsAndDaughtersDay on social media.

NATIONAL SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S DAY HISTORY

The earliest record National Day Calendar could find of an August 11th observance of this day took place in 1988. It’s mentioned in a Nanaimo (British Columbia, Canada) Daily News article dated August 12, 1988. While we were unable to identify the creator of National Son’s and Daughter’s Day, we did find other earlier events with this name. 

According to an article in the August 20, 1944, St. Joseph News-Press/Gazette, in 1936, J Henry Dusenberry first pursued the idea of a Sons’ and Daughters’ Day. The thought occurred to him after hearing a child ask why there was no such occasion. Through his efforts, the day started in Missouri and spread. Parents placed a flower representing each of their children in a vase and put it in a prominent room in the house. Throughout the day, parents thought about their children as they gazed at the flowers, especially those who no longer lived in the house. By 1945, the celebration reached its peak at 22 states with organizations participating in the event. 

In the years following previously mentioned holiday, organizations such as the Lions Club and women’s auxiliaries would hold Sons and Daughters Day in their municipalities. However, these observances would change from year to year. 

Then, in 1972, Florida Congressman Claude Pepper submitted a request for the establishment of a Sons’ and Daughters’ Day on behalf of Georgia Paul of Del Rio, Texas. According to the Del Rio News-Herald dated October 28, 1972, the request suggested the proclamation would observe the day on last Sunday in January annually. However, neither the House nor the Senate signed a bill or joint resolution to declare the day.

National Spirit of '45 Day - Second Sunday in August

NATIONAL SPIRIT OF ’45 Day

National Spirit of ’45 Day honors the can-do attitude of an entire generation affected by the trials and hardships of World War II. Observed every year on the second Sunday in August, communities around the country hold events and memorials. Each one honors those who have inspired us, sacrificed and preserved our nation for future generations.

The day ideally sets out to illustrate the people of the Greatest Generation. Over the years, iconic images have been imprinted on our minds. However, they only tell a part of the story. Still, thousands more remain to be told. Spirit of ’45 Day urges us to explore the history. Listen to the stories. Get involved and help preserve the memories of those who lived it.

Around the world, servicemen and women stepped up to the task in the Pacific, Europe, the Mediterranean or Africa. At home, men and women provided valuable food, parts, and labor.  Everyone did their part. The youngest of them managed farm work and took on duties on the homefront. Often, supplies of certain items were low – rubber for tires or leather for shoes for example. And gas, too. Rationing was not uncommon.

The generation innovated. They sacrificed. And roles shifted. While they did, technology advanced, too. As a result, manufacturing faced a new horizon.

Those motived to do their duty often did so a personal cost. While migrating great distances, sometimes the only means of communication was the post office. Journalists filled in the blanks via radio and newspaper. Their words filled the airwaves or emptied bottles of ink onto pages with their stories. And the nation paid attention.

HOW TO OBSERVE #SpiritOf45Day

Even though nearly 45 years has passed, so much can be learned from those who endured World War II. Some of those lessons are still being learned today. The Spirit of ’45 Organizationprovides a place to register and find events for upcoming the upcoming Spirit of ’45 Day.  They also share past Spirit of ’45 events to keep the inspiration, honor, and preservation alive.

  • Visit with one of the Greatest Generation and record an interview.
  • Dive into history and uncover the untold stories by touring the National World War II Museum in New Orleans.
  • Learn about people like Betty Wason or the contributions of the USO.
  • Help create a wall of honor with the Spirit of ’45 organization.
  • Share using #NationalSpiritof45 on social media.

NATIONAL SPIRIT OF ’45 DAY HISTORY

In 1996, a project paired children with seniors to document their memories from World War II. Started by Warren Hegg and the Spirit of ’45 Organization, the project grew. Soon they realized many shared a common story.

In 2009, spokesman Ernest Borgnine and Edith Shain* talked about a day honoring the World War II generation. A year later in  2010, Congress passed a joint resolution in commemoration of the 65th anniversary of the day President Truman announced the end of World War II.

*Edith Shain is one of the women who claims to be the woman kissing the sailor in the iconic Times Square photo.

National Presidential Joke Day - August 11

NATIONAL PRESIDENTIAL JOKE DAY

National Presidential Joke Day is observed annually on August 11.

This day recognizes the humor often found and yet not so appreciated in the highest office in the land. With a nod to the blunders, take a look back at some of our presidents’ social missteps. Many of them awkward. While in the moment, the Commander in Chief might not find them so funny. Looking back, sometimes, they’re downright hilarious mistakes.

  • Everyone loves hot dogs. There’s even a National Hot Dog Day. However, when the President of the United States serves them to the King and Queen of England, things might become awkward. In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt hosted a good old fashioned wiener roast when King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited the U.S. in 1939.
  • In 1968, President Richard Nixon joined the set of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In. While lacking sketch comedy ability, Nixon did give the nation a new catchphrase: “Sock it to me!”
  • George H. W. Bush pledged in 1988, “Read my lips: no new taxes.” Two years later, Bush raised taxes.
  • Sometimes the gaffes are vice presidential. At a Trenton, New Jersey spelling bee in 1992, Vice President Dan Quayle misspelled the word potato.

During an election year, the scrutiny of the constituency can be brutal. The presidential candidates should be prepared to handle the presidential joke.  The citizenry will be listening!

HOW TO OBSERVE #PresidentialJokeDay

Share your favorite presidential missteps and jokes. Who recovered the best? Let us know and use #PresidentialJokeDay to share on social media.

NATIONAL PRESIDENTIAL JOKE HISTORY

National Presidential Joke Day began on August 11, 1984. During a soundcheck for his Saturday evening radio broadcast, President Ronald Reagan joked, “My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.” Since 1982, the networks had agreed comments made during sound checks were off the record.  However, someone leaked the recording to the general public. Eventually, CBS broadcast the recording on its Monday evening report. Critics blasted Reagan as being unpresidential, and others considered the joke harmless under most circumstances.

National Raspberry Bombe Day - August 11

NATIONAL RASPBERRY BOMBE DAY

National Raspberry Bombe Day on August 11th recognizes this tantalizing frozen dessert. A raspberry bombe creates a beautiful finale to any summer meal, and it’s delicious, too!

Throughout August, raspberries are ripening. That’s why this is the third raspberry holiday in the month. Who doesn’t love the sweet, juicy berry? And they’re even better frozen into a delicious dessert. 

A typical bombe contains sherbet, heavy cream, sugar, chopped nuts, candied fruit and a dash of rum. The dessert is layered using a spherical mold and frozen overnight. With raspberries as the main ingredient, the result creates a terrific centerpiece. 

Since one raspberry bush can yield several hundred berries per year, make more than one raspberry bombe. That way you can celebrate two days in a row or share with a friend. While the raspberry bombe is already an eye-catching dessert, add some rose petals to the finished product. Why? They will be a conversation starter. Then you can tell your guests that the raspberries are in the genus Rubus of the rose family. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #RaspberryBombeDay

Cool off with a tasty raspberry bombe. Enjoy our this raspberry bombe recipe.  Use #RaspberryBombeDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL RASPBERRY BOMBE DAY HISTORY

We were unable to find the creator or the origin of Raspberry Bombe Day.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar® is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months. In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.

There’s a celebration for everyone. While National Road Trip Day satisfies the itch to wander, many pet days let us share our love of animals. National 3-D Day and National Astronaut Day honor the advancement of technology, too. Every food day you can imagine (National Avocado Day, for example), will keep you celebrating, also!

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Our Ambassador Program is another way #CelebrateEveryDay®! Whether you become an ambassador or follow one of the savvy ambassadors, their fun videos and posts will keep you prepared for every holiday.

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