Health

WORLD TWIN TO TWIN TRANSFUSION SYNDROME AWARENESS MONTH - December

World Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrom Awareness Month - December

WORLD TWIN TO TWIN TRANSFUSION SYNDROME MONTH

Expecting parents know the excitement and anxiety that comes with pregnancy. With a twin pregnancy (and other multiple pregnancies), that excitement doubles. Risk factors increase, too and that’s why World Twin to Twin Transfusion Awareness Month (World TTTS Month) serves to provide information for parents expecting twins and their doctors.

TTTS is a rare condition that only happens when twins (or other multiple pregnancies) share a placenta during gestation. Twin pregnancies occur at a rate of 31.1 to 1000 births and TTTS occurs in about 10 percent of twin pregnancies. Still, it’s important to learn about the syndrome, how it’s diagnosed and treated.

The placenta provides blood flow and nutrients during gestation. When twins share the placenta, sometimes they share the placenta unequally. This is called unequal placental sharing. As a result, one twin will receive more blood flow than the other. Blood will also transfuse between the twins when they share the same vascular structures.

Symptoms include:

  • A sudden increase in abdominal size
  • A rapid increase in weight
  • Abdominal pain or tightness
  • Early contractions

The obstetrician will conduct frequent ultrasounds to diagnose and identify TTTS early. If TTTS is present, the doctor will monitor the pregnancy closely. Treatment is available to ensure the babies grow equally and receive the same amount of blood flow.

HOW TO OBSERVE #WorldTTTSMonth

Learn more about TTT syndrome especially if you’re expecting twins. Speak with your physician and report any symptoms to your doctor. Share the observance on social media to help increase awareness. When you do, use #WorldTTTSMonth.

WORLD TWIN TO TWIN TRANSFUSION SYNDROME AWARENESS MONTH HISTORY

The TTTS Foundation founded World TTTS Awareness Day to educate the public and increase overall awareness and understanding of the risks associated with monochorionic twins, triplets, and other multiple pregnancies.