" ""
Where the World Gathers to Celebrate Every Day

NOVEMBER 29, 2019 | BUY NOTHING DAY | BLACK FRIDAY | ELECTRONIC GREETINGS DAY | NATIONAL DAY OF LISTENING | NATIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE DAY | YOU’RE WELCOMEGIVING DAY | NATIONAL FLOSSING DAY | MAIZE DAY

BUY NOTHING DAY – Day After ThanksgivingBUY NOTHING DAY

Buy Nothing Day is observed annually on the day after Thanksgiving. This day is part of a movement against consumerism, urging the world to change their purchasing habits, to consume and produce less. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #Buy Nothing Day

Instead of shopping, stay home and relax.

Other ways to so support for this day are:

  • Cut up credit cards.
  • Do a Whirl-mart – the act of disrupting others shopping by pushing your shopping cart around a store over and over while purchasing nothing.
  • Organize a Christmas Zombie walk – a visual expression of the obsession consumers have with Black Friday deal.

Use #BuyNothingDay to post on social media.

BUY NOTHING DAY HISTORY

Buy Nothing Day originated in Canada in September of 1992 as a way to protest the frenzy of Black Friday shopping.  In 1997, the day’s founder, artist Ted Dave, moved the day to the Friday after Thanksgiving to correspond with one of the most popular shopping days in the United States.

BLACK FRIDAY – Day After Thanksgiving

BLACK FRIDAY

In the United States, the day after Thanksgiving has become known as Black Friday and is considered the official kick-off for holiday shopping.  Retailers across the country slash prices, offer doorbuster deals on popular big-ticket items and often open in the wee hours of the morning to extend early bird specials.  Dedicated and thrifty shoppers line up outside the stores to be the first to grab that special deal or this season’s popular and hard-to-find gift.  

HOW TO OBSERVE #BlackFriday

Get out for those amazing Black Friday deals.

There are several ways to maximize your Black Friday shopping success:

  • Plan ahead.  Scour the ads both online and in newspapers.
  • Prioritize the wish list.  Which item will you save the most if you can nab it?
  • Check to see if any of the deals are available online.  Why stand in line when you can order from the comfort of your home?
  • Compare lists with friends and family. We can’t be in two places at once, and not all the deals on your lists will be at the same store.
  • Coordinate with your group to divide and conquer.  Work as a team to maximize successful shopping.
  • Make sure there isn’t a purchase limit.  If there is, make sure the team for that store is big enough to obtain the required number of bounty.
  • Set the alarm clock.  Some of the best Black Friday deals start soon after midnight.
  • Dress warm if you are located in the colder regions of the country.
  • Pack a snack, a thermos of tea or coffee and maybe even a lawn chair.  Those lines and the wait get long.
  • Work in pairs.  You don’t want to lose your place in line if nature calls.

Black Friday shopping just isn’t your style?  That’s okay.   Then all you will need for that is an internet connection and a credit card.

Use #BlackFriday to post on social media.

BLACK FRIDAY HISTORY

The origin of Black Friday is derived from the enormous amount of sales retailers report which can often bring their profits into the black. Black in accounting is used to describe a business making a profit as opposed to being in the red denoting losses.

Before 1980, the term Black Friday had a more ominous term in sports. It was considered a curse. For example, in 1981, on March 13th (an unlucky Friday) the 76ers lost for the second Friday the 13th in a row. Sportswriters used the term Black Friday in reference to their bad luck.

In another reference, the term described the dread of employees who would potentially be without jobs on a Friday. It also reflected the darkest and widest spread financial impacts – the fall of Wall Street. The Black Friday of 1869 may be the earliest use of the term.

ELECTRONIC GREETINGS DAY – November 29

ELECTRONIC GREETINGS DAY

Observed annually on November 29th, Electronic Greetings Day encourages us to send an electronic greeting. At the same time, the day reminds us of how much things have changed.  

The convenience and speed of sending an electronic greeting allow more people than ever to participate in this thoughtful process. We all enjoy it when someone remembers our birthdays, anniversaries, and other important life events. While greeting cards continue to be used, electronic greetings are far more cost-effective and mean equally as much.

Since the advent of the electronic greeting, social media, and other messaging systems are expanding our communication methods. We can send a birthday wish through a messaging system and include a favorite memory. If a friend is sick, we show we care by simply clicking a button and sending funny videos. When we miss someone, these days we’re never very far away. We can send them a video message. Wait, we can do better than that. We can pick up our smartphone and video chat live with them! The miracles of technology continue to expand and bring us closer all the time. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #ElectronicGreetingsDay

Send an electronic greeting. Send a message using your preferred method of communication – electronically. It may be text, video, live, or pre-recorded. Make it short or long. Maybe it will be on social media, or perhaps, it will be a sweet card through e-mail. However, you send it, Celebrate Every Day® with enthusiasm, and share it using #ElectronicGreetingsDay to post on social media.

ELECTRONIC GREETINGS DAY HISTORY

Not long after the advent of electronic mail (e-mail) in 1993, the electronic greeting came along.  Judith Donath created the first electronic greeting card site in 1994 at the MIT Media Lab. It was called the Electric Postcard. National Day Calendar® is continuing research on the source of Electronic Greetings Day.

NATIONAL DAY OF LISTENING – Day After Thanksgiving

NATIONAL DAY OF LISTENING

On the day after Thanksgiving, National Day of Listening encourages you to gather your family and friends and record family history and stories for preservation. The program, created by StoryCorps, reminds us of the value our stories hold. 

” …every life matters equally, every voice matters equally, every story matters equally…”  David Isay, founder of StoryCorps

Have you ever wondered what Grandma’s favorite memory is, or how your father got that scar on his brow? What’s the story behind a friend’s nickname?  Recording stories and sharing them gives breath to them. When we’re gathered with family and friends, we often reminisce. And while not all memories are pleasant, they hold a power over us that need to be released. Telling them and sharing them lets our friends and families learn some of the lessons, some of our culture and heritage.

We’re made of many experiences and the experiences of those who’ve gone before us. Spend the day listening to their stories. Record them. Share them. Interview someone close to you or someone new to you. Let them become an indelible part of your life. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalDayOfListening

Interview a friend or family member and record the interview.

StoryCorps provides a DIY guide as well as lists of Great Questions based on who is being interviewed.

There is no format requirement in which the interviews are recorded on National Day of Listening. Whether you record them onto digital devices, a tape recorder, or pen and paper, the important part is to record the story for future generations. If you do record in a digital format, you can also upload the recording to StoryCorps’ Wall of Listening or use #NationalDayofListening to post on social media.

National Day Calendar® Classroom followers, join the project! Visit the classroom for ideas to engage your students on #NationalDayofListening.

NATIONAL DAY OF LISTENING HISTORY

In 2008, the non-profit organization, StoryCorps, launched the National Day of Listening as a way to encourage families to set aside the day after Thanksgiving as a time to share and record the history of their family, friends and community.

NATIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE DAY – Day After Thanksgiving

NATIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE DAY

National Native American Heritage Day on the day after Thanksgiving honors American Indians across the nation. The day celebrates the vibrant cultures, traditions, and heritages while recognizing the many contributions Native Americans have made.

The day encourages listening to Native American voices and fostering pride in the vibrant and layered heritage that’s embedded deep within our society.

In the United States today, Native Americans contribute to society daily. Whether through art or government, their insight and perspective elevate an art form or a district. They serve in the military, the medical and legal fields. Their knowledge wins battles large and small.

Carol Metcalf-Gardipe – Geologist

Ms. Gardipe’s many roles include director of the American Indian Engineering Program (the first of its kind) and one of seven founders of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES). She is also a professor, administrator, and an award-winning geologist who held positions with the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

Lila Downs – Musician

The Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter immigrated from Oaxaca, Mexico, and has been singing since she was eight-years-old. While her Latin style speaks to a global audience, her music also has heavy jazz influences.

Deb Haaland (Rep-D)

Representative Haaland was elected to Congress in 2019 from New Mexico’s 1st District. She has served on the Armed Services Committee and Natural Resources Committee. Both parents served in the U.S. Military. Her father was in the Marines and her mother in the Navy.

Emory Sekaquaptewa – Anthropologist

Hopi linguist, anthropologist, scholar, educator, artist, and appellate court judge, Emory Sekaquaptewa is best known for developing the first Hopi language dictionary.

Master Sgt. Woodrow W. Keeble

In 2008, Keeble became the first full-blooded Sioux Indian to receive the Medal of Honor. During a battle in the Korean War, his actions saved the lives of fellow Soldiers. He was born in 1917 in Waubay, SD, but spent most of his life growing up near Wahpeton, ND. As the war heated up in Europe, Keeble joined the North Dakota National Guard in 1942. His service included World War II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars. He earned the Distinguished Service Cross, the Silver Star, the Bronze Star, two Purple Hearts and the Combat Infantryman Badge in addition to the Medal of Honor.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NativeAmericanHeritageDay

To celebrate Native American Heritage Day, try any of the following:

  • Read a story about or by a Native American.
  • Visit one of many Native American museums, heritage centers, or historical sights.
  • Try a delicious Native American recipe.
  • Watch a movie or documentary about or by a Native American.
  • Participate in or watch a game of Lacrosse.
  • Attend one of many seminars, performances, or events honoring Native American culture across the country.

Use #NativeAmericanHeritageDay to post on social media.

NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY DAY HISTORY

Riding horseback from state to state in 1914, Red Fox James, a Blackfoot Indian, sought endorsement from 24 states in support of a national day recognizing and honoring Native Americans. He presented these endorsements to the White House the following year. While no national day was proclaimed, the state of New York declared the second Saturday in May as American Indian Day.

In 1986, the 99th Congress passed a joint resolution authorizing the President to proclaim the week of November 23-30, 1986, as American Indian Week. President Ronald Reagan declared the first American Indian week that year and each year following of his presidency. President George H.W. Bush continued the proclamations until 1990 when he approved a joint resolution to declare November as National American Indian Heritage Month. This tradition has continued annually. In 2008 the Native American Heritage Day Act was enacted by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama.

You're Welcomegiving - Day After Thankgsgiving

YOU’RE WELCOMEGIVING DAY

You’re Welcomegiving Day is observed annually on the day after Thanksgiving. Conventionally when someone thanks us for a kindness or service, we respond by saying, “You’re Welcome.”  So, it was inevitable that someone would suggest the day after Thanksgiving we should remember to say, “You’re welcome.” 

The phrase “you’re welcome” covers a variety of thank yous in English. Whether the appreciation is coming from an individual or a group, “you’re welcome” works. It can be said while giving a hug, a handshake, or a smile. When we really mean that our effort was meant with care, “you’re very welcome” goes a long way. Our tone and facial expressions say a lot, too.

However, in other languages, “you’re welcome” doesn’t translate so well. The plural and singular “you” is part of the problem. Also, in some languages, the phrase is unknown altogether. Variations of a response to a show of appreciation exist all over the world, but “you’re welcome” as a polite social necessity seems to only exist in English. 

Other similar responses in English exist, but they don’t seem as automatic making them more sincere when spoken. Try these examples out the next time someone thanks you:

  • It was our pleasure.
  • I was honored to do it. 
  • Our home is your home. 
  • I was happy to (fill in the blank).
  • It was a delight having you.
  • I hope someone will do the same for me if I’m ever in the same predicament.
  • We enjoyed (fill in the blank).
  • This is our favorite thing to do!

HOW TO OBSERVE #YoureWelcomegivingDay

Say “You’re welcome” in your own way. Whether you host an event, volunteer, or help someone out, what’s your favorite way to say, “You’re welcome”? Let us know by using #YoureWelcomegivingDay to post on social media.

YOU’RE WELCOMEGIVING DAY HISTORY

Richard Ankli of Ann Arbor, Michigan, creator of the unreasonable holiday Sourest Day and the rhyming May Ray Day, designated You’re Welcomegiving Day in 1977 as a way to create a four-day weekend.

National Flossing Day - Day After Thanksgiving

NATIONAL FLOSSING DAY

After enjoying a grand meal, National Flossing Day reminds us to take care of our teeth and gums. This health observance takes place each year on the day after Thanksgiving!

The American Dental Association recommends flossing at least once a day to achieve the best results for oral health. Daily flossing removes plaque from areas between your teeth where a toothbrush is ineffective.  Plaque can turn into calculus or tarter so it is important to floss daily.  Flossing is also an important step in the prevention of gum disease and cavities.

Taking care of our teeth and gums is an important health practice that helps us enjoy many Thanksgiving dinners to come. There are a variety of flossing products that help us take care of teeth. We can use waxed or unwaxed floss. Minty wax gives our gums a fresher breath. The floss removes food particles and prevents plaque build-up between cleanings.

For more information on flossing, go to www.Flossing.org.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalFlossingDay

This would be a good day to develop the habit of flossing. Use #NationalFlossingDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL FLOSSING DAY HISTORY

The National Flossing Council created National Flossing Day in the year 2000.

Maize Day - Day After Thanksgivng

MAIZE DAY

Maize Day recognizes a plant common across the Americas. It is celebrated annually on the day after Thanksgiving.

The day is set aside for all Americans regardless of ethnicity, naturalized citizens, descendants of the first peoples of the Americas or descendants of immigrants. We all celebrate the traditional role of corn in these cultures.

While other plant life was transplanted and imported, corn was common across the Americas. It was a central food source used by all the nations and an important part of their everyday diet. The day also celebrates the traditional crops and foods of Native Americans.

There are many varieties of maize. Depending on the kind of maize, it may make delicious corn tortillas. Others are best roasted and eaten on the cob. And of course, some kinds of maize make perfect popping corn. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #MaizeDay

Serve a meal featuring ingredients used by Native Americans. There such as fish, squash, beans, nuts, tomatoes, mushrooms, persimmons, honey, cattail, asparagus, chicory, dandelion and of course maize.  Use #MaizeDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL MAIZE DAY HISTORY

National Maize Day was started by artist Corinne Lightweaver in 2004.

This holiday began as a small research project through which I intended—with my family—to commemorate the United States holiday of Thanksgiving through the viewpoint of the indigenous people. – Corinne Lightweaver

Recipe of the Day

Basic Truffle Recipe
Prep:  1 hour
Cook:
Total Prep:  1 hour
Serves 60

Ingredients:

1 8 ounce package cream cheese, softened
3 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
3 cups semisweet chocolate chips, melted
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla (may substitute orange, almond, maple, or coffee liqueur)
various toppings (chopped nuts, shredded coconut, sprinkles, cocoa, shaved chocolate)

Instructions:

Beat cream cheese in a large bowl until smooth.

Add the confectioner’s sugar one cup at a time until well blended.

Stir in chocolate and vanilla until well incorporated.

(If using a liqueur flavoring, divide the mixture into thirds and add 1 tablespoon of the preferred liqueur to each prepared mixture.)

Chill for 1 hour.

Shape into 1 inch balls. Roll in your favorite toppings.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar® is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months. In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.

There’s a celebration for everyone. While National Road Trip Day satisfies the itch to wander, many pet days let us share our love of animals. National 3-D Day and National Astronaut Day honor the advancement of technology, too. Every food day you can imagine (National Avocado Day, for example), will keep you celebrating, also!

Be sure to stay in the know by signing up for our e-mail updates. Also, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Our Ambassador Program is another way #CelebrateEveryDay®! Whether you become an ambassador or follow one of the savvy ambassadors, their fun videos and posts will keep you prepared for every holiday.

Advertisements
Share
X