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May 6, 2021 - NATIONAL NURSES DAY – WORLD PASSWORD DAY – NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER – NATIONAL BEVERAGE DAY – NATIONAL CREPE SUZETTE DAY - NATIONAL DAY OF REASON

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MAY 6, 2021 | NATIONAL NURSES DAY | WORLD PASSWORD DAY | NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER | NATIONAL BEVERAGE DAY | NATIONAL CREPE SUZETTE DAY | NATIONAL DAY OF REASON

NATIONAL NURSES DAY – May 6

NATIONAL NURSES DAY

National Nurses Day is observed annually on May 6th. On this day, we raise awareness of all nurse contributions and commitments and acknowledge the vital role nurses play in society. This day is also the first day of National Nurses Week and is sometimes known as National RN Recognition Day. 

National Nurses Week begins May 6th and ends on May 12th, which is the birthday of Florence Nightingale (May 12, 1820 – August 13, 1910).  Florence Nightingale was a celebrated English, social reformer, statistician, and the founder of modern nursing. She became well-known while taking care of the wounded soldiers during the Crimean War. Nightingale was dubbed The Lady with the Lamp because of her habit of making rounds at night.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalNursesDay

Recognize nurses everywhere. Celebrate their dedication and commitment to their patients and their profession. Tell someone about the excellent care you’ve received from a nurse.

When you visit the doctor or have surgery, follow the instructions they give you, especially follow-up care. Ask questions, so they know when you need more information. They can’t read your minds. 

Give nurses you know a shout-out and thank them for their hard work, especially during these challenging times. 

Use #NationalNursesDay to share on social media.

NATIONAL NURSES DAY HISTORY

In 1953, Dorothy Sutherland, an employee at the United States Department of Health, sent a letter to President Eisenhower proposing a National Nurses Day. An official proclamation was not made. The following year people began celebrating National Nurses Week on their own.

In 1974, President Nixon proclaimed a National Nurse Week. New Mexico nurses initiated a resolution in 1981 to have May 6th declared National Recognition Day for Nurses. The American Nurses Association (ANA) Board of Directors took up the banner and promoted the proposal. In 1982, the United States Congress designated May 6th to be National Recognition Day for Nurses and President Ronald Reagan signed the proposal. The ANA Board of Directors later expanded the celebration in 1990 to a week-long celebration (May 6-12) known as National Nurses Week. 

Each year the American Nurses Association (ANA) chooses a theme to acknowledge the many services provided by nurses everywhere during National Nurses Week. Examples of past themes include:

2000- Nurses: Keeping the Care in Healthcare
2002 – Nurses Care for America
2003 – Nurses: Lifting Spirits, Touching Lives
2006 – Nurses: Strength, Commitment, Compassion
2015 – Ethical Practice. Quality Care.
2018 – Nurses: Inspire, Innovate, Influence
2019 – 4 Million Reasons to Celebrate
2020 – Nurses: A Voice to Lead

WORLD PASSWORD DAY – FIRST THURSDAY IN MAY

WORLD PASSWORD DAY

Each year on the first Thursday in May, World Password Day promotes better password habits. Passwords are critical gatekeepers to our digital identities, allowing us to access online shopping, dating, banking, social media, private work, and life communications.

In a cyber world, secure passwords are important. Other than keeping your information offline, long, unique and complex passwords protect your valuable information best. Another tactic is changing your passwords every few months or any time you think your accounts have been compromised. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #WorldPasswordDay

Take the #WorldPasswordDay pledge and share these password tips on social media, too:

  • change an old password to a long, strong one 
  • turn on two-factor authentication for your important accounts
  • password protect your wireless router
  • don’t store passwords on your computer or phone
  • log off when you’re done with a program
  • periodically remove temporary internet files

WORLD PASSWORD DAY HISTORY

Security researcher Mark Burnett first encouraged people to have a “password day,” where they update important passwords in his 2005 book Perfect Passwords. Inspired by his idea, Intel Security took the initiative to declare the first Thursday in May World Password Day in May 2013. Submitted by Big Monocle in 2016, Password Day is meant to create awareness of the need for good password security. 

The Registrar at National Day Calendar has designated the first Thursday of May of each year as World Password Day. 

About Big Monocle

Founded in 2012, Big Monocle designs creative branding and marketing that tells impactful stories. Their growing, energetic team of talented professionals focus on developing experiences and connecting with every client.

NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER – First Thursday in May

NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER

The National Day of Prayer is observed annually on the first Thursday in May. This day observance, designated by the United States Congress, asks people “to turn to God in prayer and meditation.” 

For many, prayer is an integral part of daily life. Prayer offers a rich connection to our spiritual lives, nurturing our relationships and faith. It also provides comfort in times of crisis or need. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalDayOfPrayer

People of many different faiths join in prayer on this day. While some will attend the church, synagogue, mosque, temple or monasteries of their choice to pray, others will attend interdenominational prayer events. Some will join prayer groups or meditate. Use #NationalDayOfPrayer to post on social media.

NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER HISTORY

In the early 1950s, an evangelical movement called for Congress and the President to proclaim a National Day of Prayer. The movement grew and a young leader, Evangelist Billy Graham, led services for approximately 20,000 on the steps of the Capitol on February 3, 1952. Later that year, Congress proclaimed a joint resolution for a National Day of Prayer. President Harry S. Truman proclaimed a National Day of Prayer to be observed on July 4, 1952. Each year since that date, Americans have observed the day in their own way. The observance moved to the first Thursday in May by President Ronald Reagan and has been proclaimed each year since.

As a Nation, presidents and government officials have called for national days of prayer or thanks intermittently since before the country’s existence. 

  • July 20, 1775 – The Continental Congress issued a proclamation recommending “a day of public humiliation, fasting, and prayer” be observed.
  • In 1795 –  George Washington proclaimed a day of public thanksgiving and prayer.
  • May 9, 1798 – John Adams declared this day as “a day of solemn humility, fasting, and prayer.”
  • March 1863 –  On March 3 Abraham Lincoln signed a Congressional resolution, during the Civil War, which called for April 30, 1863, as a day of fasting and prayer.

For more information on National Day of Prayer visit the website nationaldayofprayer.org.

NATIONAL BEVERAGE DAY – May 6

NATIONAL BEVERAGE DAY

National Beverage Day on May 6th encourages us to sit back, relax, and enjoy our favorite beverages.  

Beverages come in many forms. And whether you prefer a hot beverage or a cold one, the choice is yours. Serve up a caffeinated drink poured over over ice. Make it carbonated or mix it up as a cocktail or a mocktail as the case may be. Beverages may be freshly squeezed, frozen, blended, or creamy. They can even be sweet, sour, bitter, smooth, or dry.  

We drink them to cool off and to warm up. We also drink them to chill out and serve them to add sparkle to a celebration. In fact, every month on the National Day Calendar includes a beverage celebration. Although, some months celebrate more than others. While January is quite busy and raises a glass to milk, green juice, and the bloody Mary, February only celebrates Kahlua. The busiest beverage month on the calendar (so far) is July. It even hails the Dive Bars we like to frequent. Though, May doesn’t shy away from beverage celebrations, either. We just celebrated lemonade and America’s favorite beverage, orange juice, and will celebrate several more in May, too!

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalBeverageDay

Observe National Beverage Day by singing to a “beverage” inspired song while enjoying your tasty beverage!  We’ve listed a few of our favorites:

“Beer for My Horses” by Toby Keith and Willie Nelson

“Red Red Wine” by UB40

“All Summer Long” by Kid Rock

“I Drink Alone” by George Thorogood and the Destroyers

Post photos of your favorite beverage on social media using #NationalBeverageDay

NATIONAL BEVERAGE DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues to research the origins of this thirst-quenching holiday. 

NATIONAL CREPE SUZETTE DAY – May 6

NATIONAL CREPE SUZETTE DAY

May 6th honors a unique and delicious dessert on National Crepe Suzette Day! 

While there are slightly different versions of crepes Suzette, the dish is quite distinct from most other crepe dishes. The recipe first appeared in the 19th century in Paris courtesy of Chef Henri Charpentier. According to the chef’s memoir, he accidentally ruined a sauce for the crepes he was serving Prince Edward of Wales (the would-be King Edward VII) and his guests. With no time to recover, he tasted the burned sauce and discovered the flavors blended deliciously. When he served the dish, Charpentier named it Crepes Princesse. However, when the prince gently protested, Charpentier changed the name to Suzette in honor of the one female guest at the table.

Charpentier would later come to the United States and serve as John D. Rockefeller’s chef. However, before that, Charpentier was world renown and learned under Auguste Escoffier (a chef known for other celebrated dishes).

The French dessert consists of a crepe with a beurre Suzette sauce. To make the sauce, caramelized sugar and butter, orange juice and zest, and orange liqueur. Once set afire, the alcohol evaporates quickly, resulting in a thick caramelized sauce. Restaurants often prepare Crepes Suzettes at the table of the guests.

HOW TO OBSERVE #CrepeSuzetteDay

Try making crepe Suzette or order it for dessert from your favorite restaurant. There are so many recipes to try! Check out the one below or share your favorite using #CrepeSuzetteDay to post on social media.

Crepe Suzette

NATIONAL CREPE SUZETTE DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues researching the origins of this pastry holiday. 

NATIONAL DAY OF REASON – First Thursday in May

NATIONAL DAY OF REASON

National Day of Reason is observed each year on the first Thursday in the month of May. The observance originated in 2003 in response to the perceived unconstitutional National Day of Prayer. According to the organizers of the day, the National Day of Prayer, “violates the First Amendment of The United States Constitution because it asks federal, state and local government entities to set aside tax dollar supported time and space to engage in religious ceremonies.”

The First Amendment of the United States Constitution reads:

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

The day is a secular observance for atheists, humanists, and secularists set to coincide with the National Day of Prayer. It acknowledges that celebration occurs for those who do not recognize God or an established religion or faith.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalDayOfReason

Several organizations host celebrations, food drives, and blood donations in honor of the day. Share your celebration ideas using #NationalDayofReason.

NATIONAL DAY OF REASON HISTORY

The National Day of Reason was created in 2003 by the American Humanist Association and the Washington Area Secular Humanists. For more information visit nationaldayofreason.org.


On Deck for May 7, 2021
May 6th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History
1851

The United States Patent Office issued the first U.S. patent (No. 8080) for the mechanical refrigerator to American inventor John Gorrie.

1889

The Exposition Universelle opens in Paris with its grand centerpiece, the Eiffel Tower finally on display. Its chief engineer and owner of the company who built the phenomenal tower, Gustave Eiffel, also designed the framework for the Statue of Liberty.

1937

In Lakehurst, New Jersey, the hydrogen-filled dirigible called the Hindenburg burst into flames killing 35 of the 97 passengers. A Navy crewman on the ground also died that day.

1954

British middle-distance runner Roger Bannister breaks the four-minute mile barrier for the first time in human history. He ran the one-mile race in 3 minutes, 59 seconds, 4/10 at Oxford University’s Iffley Road Track.

Recipe of the Day

Delicious Filet Mignon

Prep: 15 minutes
Cook: 6 TO 12 minutes
Total Prep: 30 minutes
Servings: 6 servings

DELICIOUS FILET MIGNON
Ingredients:

6 – 1/2 pound sliced Filet Mignon, cut around 1 1/2 inches thick.
Salt and pepper
1 clove fresh garlic – sliced
6 tablespoons – butter
1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions:

Rub both sides of each Filet with salt and pepper. Heat the oil, butter, and garlic in a saute pan. Once the butter has melted, add the beef. For rare Fillets, sear each side for around 3 minutes. Or, cook additional time for other preferred taste. Serve on a warm platter with a garnish of your choice.

May 6th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) Birthdays
Martin R Delany – 1812

Through his writing, the African American journalist, writer and soldier influenced perceptions on abolition and activism during his lifetime. He was an early supporter of emigration to Africa and wrote the novel Blake; or the Huts of America.

Dr. Sigmund Freud – 1856

The Austrian neurologist is the founder of psychoanalysis. During his career, Freud developed theories about the parts of human personality called the id, ego and superego, Oedipus complex, and dream analysis, among several others.

Orson Wells – 1915

Well known for his Shakespearean roles, Orson Welles also made a name for himself in radio and directing. Welles shook up the world with a radio broadcast of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds in 1938. In 1941, Welles set the standard for quality filmmaking with the debut of Citizen Kane.

Dr. Mukai Chiaki – 1952

On July 8, 1994, Dr. Chiaki became the first Japanese woman in space when she flew as a payload specialist aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Her second mission took place on October 29, 1998, aboard the space shuttle Discovery. With her second mission, she became the first Japanese citizen to travel to space twice.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar® is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months. In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.

There’s a celebration for everyone. While National Road Trip Day satisfies the itch to wander, many pet days let us share our love of animals. National 3-D Day and National Astronaut Day honor the advancement of technology, too. Every food day you can imagine (National Avocado Day, for example), will keep you celebrating, also!

Be sure to stay in the know by signing up for our e-mail updates. Also, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Our Ambassador Program is another way #CelebrateEveryDay®! Whether you become an ambassador or follow one of the savvy ambassadors, their fun videos and posts will keep you prepared for every holiday.

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