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MARCH 17, 2019 | ST. PATRICK’S DAY | NATIONAL CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE DAY

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

What do the color green, parades and March 17th have in common?  Of course, it is St.Patrick’s Day (also known as the Feast of St Patrick).

St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated by millions of people across the globe.  People wear the color green, drink green beverages and decorate houses and businesses in shamrocks.  In fact, the wearing of the green is a tradition that dates back to a story written about St. Patrick in 1726.  St. Patrick (c. AD 385–461) was known to use the shamrock to illustrate the Holy Trinity and to have worn green clothing.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Remember to wear green. Use #StPatricksDay to post on social media.

Check out this delicious Reuben Casserole from #holidayfoodies. You won’t regret it!

 

HISTORY

The Feast of St. Patrick started in the early 17 century. The day marks the death of St. Patrick and was chosen as an official Christian feast day and is observed by the Catholic Church. The day is also a public holiday in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, and the British Overseas Territory of Montserrat. It is also widely celebrated by the Irish diaspora around the world, especially in Great Britain, Canada, the United States, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand.

NATIONAL CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE DAY – March 17
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NATIONAL CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE DAY

National Corned Beef and Cabbage Day is observed annually on March 17th.  This seems to be fitting for St. Patrick’s Day in the United States.

To corn something is simply to preserve it in a salty brine (the term corn refers to the coarse grains of salt used for curing).

Corned beef is a salt-cured beef product. In the traditional Irish Corned Beef and Cabbage recipes, salt pork or bacon joint was used instead of corned beef.  Sometime in the mid-1800s when the Irish immigrated to America, they found that Jewish corned beef was very similar in texture to bacon joint (pork).  It was then that corned beef was used as a replacement for the bacon when preparing corned beef and cabbage meals.   Soon after, Irish-Americans began having Corned Beef and Cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day.

Corned beef and cabbage remains a popular food in many areas of the United States.

In Ireland today, the serving of corned beef is geared toward tourist consumption.  Most Irish in Ireland do not identify it as native cuisine.

  • In the United States, corned beef is often purchased ready to eat in delicatessens.
  • Smoking corned beef and adding spice mixes produces a smoked meat such as pastrami.
  • Corned beef can be found sold in minced forms and cans.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Try the following recipe, you will love it!:

Crock Pot Easy Corn Beef and Cabbage Recipe

Use #CornedBeefAndCabbageDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Our research was unable to find the origin and the creator of National Corned Beef and Cabbage Day.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar™ is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months.  In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.
 
Whether you want to celebrate your favorite mail carrier and flip flops, share your joy for bacon and chocolate cake or enjoy popcorn (our office favorite) on National Popcorn Day, stay in-the-know by signing-up for our e-mail updates, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Don’t find yourself unprepared on Talk Like a Pirate Day or Answer the Phone Like Buddy the Elf Day – join us as we #CelebrateEveryDay!

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