Where the World Gathers to Celebrate Every Day

JUNE 12, 2021 | NATIONAL ROSÉ DAY | NATIONAL LOVING DAY | NATIONAL RED ROSE DAY | NATIONAL PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE DAY | NATIONAL JERKY DAY

NATIONAL ROSÉ DAY – Second Saturday in June

NATIONAL ROSÉ DAY

National Rosé Day on the second Saturday in June each year recognizes a wine that complements many dishes. Rosé is probably the oldest known type of wine, dating back as far as 600 BC. Rosé wines are generally made from red grapes and are very versatile wines. A rosé wine will also be lighter in color than red wine, deeper in color than white wine. The pink color of rosé wine depends on the time the grape skin stays in contact with the juice, also known as maceration. There are also rosé wines that are semi-sparkling or sparkling, with different intensities of sweetness levels and dryness.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalRoseDay

bodvar-rose-nrd-logo-transparentCelebrate the day by having a bottle of Rosé wine with dinner or simply invite friends over for h’orderves and enjoy each other’s company. Share your special evening on Social Media on Facebook@NationalRoséDay and Instagram@nationalroseday using #NationalRoséDay.

NATIONAL ROSÉ DAY HISTORY

In 2014, Bodvár – House of Rosés – a rosé house specializing in rosé wines, founded National Rosé Day to share their love of the rosé and give rosé lovers a day to unite together and celebrate.

The Registrar at National Day Calendar proclaimed the day to be observed on the second Saturday in June, annually. The first celebration took place on June 14, 2014.

Media Contact:  Ann Hafström | Chief Operating Officer | Email ann@bodvarrose.com 

Visit Bodvár – House of Rosés – National Rosé Day for more information about rosé wines and the annual official celebration that will be held by Bodvár. 

NATIONAL LOVING DAY – June 12

NATIONAL LOVING DAY

Each year, National Loving Day on June 12th commemorates the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving vs. Virginia. This decision struck down all anti-miscegenation laws remaining in sixteen U.S. states. The ruling cited, “There can be no doubt that restricting the freedom to marry solely because of racial classifications violates the central meaning of the equal protection clause.” In the United States, anti-miscegenation laws were U.S. state laws banning interracial marriage.

Childhood friends, Mildred and Richard, met when she was 11, and he was 17. Over the years, they began courting. In 1958, when Mildred turned 18, the couple married in Washington and returned to their hometown north of Richmond. However, two weeks later, authorities arrested the couple. Mildred and Richard did not realize the state of Virginia viewed interracial marriage as illegal. The Lovings pleaded guilty, and to avoid jail time, they agreed to leave Virginia.

While living in Washington D.C., the Loving’s started legal action by writing to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy. Kennedy referred the case on to the American Civil Liberties Union. The Warren Court unanimously ruled in their favor, and the Loving’s returned to their Virginia home, where they resided with their three children.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalLovingDay

Learn more about the Loving Vs. Virginia Supreme Court decision. You can do so by reading books, listening to podcasts, or watching documentaries about the case and the events leading to the decision. We provide a few suggested sources to get you started:

Use #NationalLovingDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL LOVING DAY HISTORY

The celebration, Juneteenth, inspires National Loving Day, and the observance seeks both to commemorate and celebrate the Supreme Courts’ 1967 ruling. The goal is to keep its importance fresh in the minds of a generation that has grown up with interracial relationships being legal as well as explore issues facing couples currently in interracial relationships. While National Loving Day is not yet an officially recognized holiday by the U.S. government, a movement aims to persuade the government to do so. 

NATIONAL RED ROSE DAY – June 12

NATIONAL RED ROSE DAY

Each year on June 12th, people in the United States recognize National Red Rose Day. Today honors the flower that is a symbol of love and romance, the red rose. The rose is also the June birth flower. 

Red roses were used in many early cultures as decorations in wedding ceremonies and wedding attire. It was through this practice that, over the years, the red rose became known as a symbol of love and romance. The tradition of giving red roses as the strongest message of love is still practiced today.

Red roses offer more than the message of love. They are also known for their fragrance and are cultivated for perfumes as well as brewing healing teas. Furthermore, roses come in a wide variety of cultivars. From low-growing shrubs with dainty blossoms to long-stemmed robust plants, roses offer deep scarlets and bright berry-colored reds.

In June, red roses are in bloom in flower gardens across the United States, and their beauty and sweet scent fill the air with happiness.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalRedRoseDay

Do you have a favorite red rose or grow your own? Share your favorite red rose photos or even give a red rose to some you care about. Other ways to celebrate include:

  • Plant a red rose shrub or vine.
  • Learn more about the types of red roses.
  • Visit a rose garden. We’ve found 7 of the Most Beautiful Rose Gardens in the country for you to explore.
  • Call your favorite florist and order red roses to be sent to a teacher, first responder, or local hero.
  • Press a red rose to dry it and preserve it for later enjoyment.

Share photos of Use #NationalRedRoseDay to share on social media. 

NATIONAL RED ROSE DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues researching the origins of this flowering holiday. 

NATIONAL PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE DAY – June 12

NATIONAL PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE DAY

Baking up some goodness on June 12th each year, National Peanut Butter Cookie Day celebrates the only cookie holiday in June. The day allows cookie lovers and peanut butter lovers to step away from the pies and cakes to indulge in a little peanut butter and cookie therapy. 

Alabama’s American agricultural extension educator, George Washington Carver, promoted the peanut extensively. Well-known for his promotions, Carver compiled 105 peanut recipes from various cookbooks, agricultural bulletins, and other sources. In 1916, he created a Research Bulletin called How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it for Human Consumption. The bulletin included three recipes calling for crushed or chopped peanuts as one of its ingredients. However, peanut butter cookies were not one of them. 

It was in the early 1920s peanut butter began to be listed as an ingredient in cookies. 

Incidentally, The peanut butter we know and love today didn’t become commercially available until the 1920s. In 1922, Joseph Rosefield kept the peanut oil from separating from the solids through this process. Afterwards, he patented the process of homogenization and sold it to a company that began making a peanut butter called Peter Pan.

No one knows why we press crisscrossed fork marks into our peanut butter cookies before baking. However, homemade peanut butter cookies would just not be the same without the bit of decoration.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalPeanutButterCookieDay

The best way to celebrate this cookie holiday is with some homemade peanut butter cookies, a glass of milk, and a friend. Of course. We even have a couple of recipes for you to try. You can also visit your favorite baker and give them a shout-out, too. Let them know how much you appreciate their mad cookie baking skills!

Chunky Peanut Butter Cookie
Chocolate Swirl Peanut Butter Cookie

Don’t forget to use #NationalPeanutButterCookieDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar is researching the origins of this delicious peanut cookie holiday. In the meantime, check out these other peanut related holidays. 

  • Peanut Butter Lover’s Month
  • National Peanut Day
  • National Peanut Butter Day
  • Peanut Butter Lover’s Day
  • Peanut Month

    NATIONAL JERKY DAY – June 12

    NATIONAL JERKY DAY

    National Jerky Day on June 12th each year celebrates the rich history, immense popularity, and nutritional benefits of dried meat snacks.

    This nutrient-dense meat is made lightweight by drying. A pound of meat or poultry will weigh only about four ounces after transforming it into jerky. Properly prepared jerky can be stored for months without refrigeration because the drying process removes most of the moisture. Salt added to the meat before the drying process begins helps to prevent bacteria from developing. 

    The word “jerky” is derived from the Spanish word charqui, which came from the Quechua (a Native South American language) word ch’arki, which means to burn (meat).   

    Convenience stores, gas stations, supermarkets and variety shops all across the United States offer traditional jerky in individual servings and in larger packages, too. They also offer it in a variety of flavors and add spices for additional heat. 

    While on road trips, camping, or even long-distance flights, jerky staves off hunger until the next meal. It’s easy to pack, too. So easy, in fact, that due to its lightweight and high level of nutrition, it’s even been to space. Since 1996, astronauts have selected jerky as space food several times for space flights. 

    HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalJerkyDay

    Snack on your favorite jerky. If you make your own, give a shout-out. The process is satisfying and the results often bring friends and family clamoring for more. Jerky can serve as more than a snack food. Use it as an ingredient in your cooking, especially when your camping or exploring the great outdoors. Experiment with sauces, soups, and stews using jerky. We have one recipe for you to try, too. 

    Homemade Tomato Sauce With Jerky

    Share your favorite jerky using #NationalJerkyDay to post on social media.

    Are you looking for #NationalJerkyDay deals? We’ve got ’em! Check out our Celebration Deals page. If your business is celebrating the day with an offer, send us a message through our Contact Us link, and we’ll get it added.

    NATIONAL JERKY DAY HISTORY

    Jack Link’s Beef Jerky and the Wisconsin Beef Council founded National Jerky Day in 2012. Check out these other easy road trip snack days:


June 12th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

1939

The National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, opens. The town’s connection to baseball is based on a story about a Civil War general named Doubleday. According to lore, Abner Doubleday invented to sport there. While much of the story is now disputed, the nostalgia and history continue to grow there.

1963

Byron De La Beckwith murders the Medgar Evers in Jackson, Mississippi.

1967

In Loving vs. Virginia, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down all anti-miscegenation laws remaining in sixteen U.S. states.

1987

While visiting Berlin, President Ronald Reagan gave a speech in which he spoke the now-famous line, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” Two years later on November 9, 1989, East and West Berlin were reunited.

Recipe of the Day

Pan Fried Onion Slices
Prep:  5 minutes
Cook:  10 minutes
Total Prep:  15 minutes
Servings:  4

Ingredients:

2 large onions (9 to 11 ounces each), peeled and sliced 1/2-inch thick
1 to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 teaspoon oregano, crushed
Pepper to taste

Instructions:

Pan-fry onion slices in large skillet 8 to 10 minutes or until onions are tender; turn halfway through cooking time.

Sprinkle slices with cheese, oregano and pepper and heat until cheese melts.

June 12th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) Birthdays

George H.W. Bush – 1912

Serving first as vice president under Ronald Regan, George H. W. Bush took the oath of office as the 41st president and served one term. He and his son George W. Bush are the second father/son presidents in the history of the country.   John Adams and John Quincy Adams were the first.

Anne Frank – 1929

Anne Frank moved generations with the words she recorded in her diary – the diary of a young Jewish girl. In 1942, just weeks after receiving a red checkered diary for her 13th birthday, Anne’s family and the families of her father’s employees were forced into hiding. While in hiding, Anne wrote every day in her diary. When she and her family were discovered, the Nazis’ separated and sent them to concentration camps. Her father would be the one family member to survive.

Jim Nabors – 1930

The American actor, singer and comedian is best known for his role as Gomer Pyle on the program The Andy Griffith Show.

Chick Corea – 1941

The American jazz musician began performing in the 1960s and has earned 65 Grammy nods during his career. In 1975, he won his first Grammy for the performance of No Mystery with the band he founded, Return to Forever.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar® is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months. In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.

There’s a celebration for everyone. While National Road Trip Day satisfies the itch to wander, many pet days let us share our love of animals. National 3-D Day and National Astronaut Day honor the advancement of technology, too. Every food day you can imagine (National Avocado Day, for example), will keep you celebrating, also!

Be sure to stay in the know by signing up for our e-mail updates. Also, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Our Ambassador Program is another way #CelebrateEveryDay®! Whether you become an ambassador or follow one of the savvy ambassadors, their fun videos and posts will keep you prepared for every holiday.

Share