FEBRUARY 7, 2020 | NATIONAL WEAR RED DAY | NATIONAL SEND A CARD TO A FRIEND DAY | NATIONAL PERIODIC TABLE DAY | BUBBLE GUM DAY | NATIONAL FETTUCCINE ALFREDO DAY

NATIONAL WEAR RED DAY – First Friday in February

NATIONAL WEAR RED DAY

National Wear Red Day, on the first Friday in February, is an annual campaign to raise awareness about heart disease in women. 

Heart disease and stroke kill one in three women. These diseases are 80 percent preventable according to Go Red for Women’s official website.

Go to www.goredforwomen.org for more information.

HOW TO OBSERVE #WearRedDay

This national campaign has revved up its red!

  • Wear red to show your support for saving women’s lives
  • Show us how you Go Red on your social media profiles using #GoRedWearRed
  • Donate to help raise funds for awareness and research.  Get your red gear at shopheart.org and a portion of every purchase goes back to the programming and mission of the American Heart Association.
  • Know your numbers.  Find out more about your risk factors at the American Heart Association website.
  • #GoRedGetFit – earn prizes and get healthy while fighting heart disease with the American Heart Association.  Find out more at GoRedForWomen.org or join the challenge on Facebook GoRedGetFit.

NATIONAL WEAR RED DAY HISTORY

The Go Red for Women campaign started in 2004 when the American Heart Association took on the challenge of raising awareness about the number 1 cause of death in women.

NATIONAL SEND A CARD TO A FRIEND DAY – February 7

NATIONAL SEND A CARD TO A FRIEND DAY

National Send A Card To A Friend Day on February 7th reminds us to send friendly cheer through the mail. We do that by sending a note or message on a card to the friends we hold dear. Throughout the year, we often think about our friends. We wonder how they are, miss them and remember fond memories of times shared. 

Sending a card to someone for a variety of reasons dates back to ancient times. The Chinese would send elegantly designed messages as well as the Egyptians, though on different types of paper. During the Rennaisance, greeting cards gained popularity for specific holidays and events. Victorian times increased the use of the greeting card for Valentine’s Day, Christmas, birthdays and more. 

While our more digital era may turn away from the flowery language of greeting cards, a surprising 80 percent of adults still purchase them. While they may only make these purchases for special occasions and are more likely to include them with a gift when they’re attending an event, they are purchasing. That said, retailers continue to reduce their footprint in the greeting card aisle. 

All the facts would add up to a faster fading “Just Thinking of You” type of card. However nice it is to receive sweet text, wouldn’t it be less of a chore to go to the mailbox if occasionally you found a notecard from a friend?  

HOW TO OBSERVE #SendACardToAFriendDay

Send a card to your friends. You can buy cards at a store, or you can make them yourself. Whichever way you choose, set aside a few minutes to write a short note or a long note in a card and send one to make a friend’s day! Use #SendACardToAFriendDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL SEND A CARD TO FRIEND DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues researching the origins of this friendly holiday. As we do, we’re also making friends that we need to send cards to, too! 

NATIONAL PERIODIC TABLE DAY – February 7

NATIONAL PERIODIC TABLE DAY

On February 7th, National Periodic Table Day recognizes the publication of the first table of elements and how it has changed over the years. 

To understand the development of the periodic table, we first must understand the discovery of elements and their effect on science. Ancient man knew of few elements. By the 1st century A.D., mankind knew about the elements of gold, silver, copper, iron, lead, tin, mercury, sulfur, and carbon. Over time, we added arsenic, antimony, phosphorus, and zinc to our discoveries. By 1809, there were 47 discovered elements.

Johann Döbereiner made one of the earliest attempts to organize the elements in 1817. He organized elements into groups of three, or triads, based on similar qualities.

John Newlands

On February 7, 1863, English chemist John Newlands published one of the first table of elements. Newlands divided the known 56 elements into 11 groups based on the “Law of Octaves.” His table suggested that any one element will have similar properties to elements eight places before and behind it on the table.

Arranging the elements according to increasing atomic weight, Newlands was one of the first scientists to detect a pattern to the properties of elements. As a result, his table left room for new discoveries and predicting future discovered elements would complete the table. In fact, Newlands correctly predicted the discovery of Germanium.

Future Discoveries

While parts of Newlands’ periodic table contained flaws, so did other later proposed tables. In 1869, chemist Dimitri Mendeleev published a paper developing a new periodic table. Mendeleev’s table also arranged the elements based on atomic mass. By this time, only 60 of the over 100 elements we know today were discovered.

As on previous tables, inaccuracies were attributed to some of those elements. While Mendeleev corrected some of these inaccuracies, he didn’t correct them all. Mendeleev made assumptions about others causing elements to be placed incorrectly on the table. Like Newlands, Mendeleev also predicted discoveries, and he correctly predicted the properties of five elements and their compounds.

The discoveries throughout Scot William Ramsay’s career from 1892 to 1910, along with John William Strutt, Morris Travers and Frederick Soddy led to the identification of the noble gasses. In 1904, the Nobel Prize was awarded to Ramsay for discovering five elements.

Henry Moseley

Henry Moseley, an experimental physicist, contributed to the development of the modern periodic table. In 1913, Moseley discovered that each element has a specific number of protons. As a result, four new chemical elements were later found, though not during his lifetime.

Since the early 20th century, the periodic table remains largely unchanged. However, the 21st century is still young. Some researchers suggest new approaches to the periodic table while maintaining its integrity as one of the most valuable tools in the science of chemistry. The current table tallies a total of 118 elements.  

HOW TO OBSERVE #PeriodicTableDay

Test your knowledge of the periodic table. Celebrate with Periodic Table trivia or challenging each other to name the elements. Take it a step further and name the number of protons in each element.  

Visit www.PeriodicTableDay.org for more information. Use #PeriodicTableDay to post on social media.

Educators, visit the National Day Calendar Classroom pages for ways to incorporate National Periodic Table Day into your classroom.

NATIONAL PERIODIC TABLE DAY HISTORY

On February 7, 2016, the first National Periodic Table Day was founded on February 7, 2016. The day serves to promote the challenges overcome to develop the modern periodic table. Mr. David T. Steineker, author, inventor, and chemistry teacher at Jefferson County Public Schools in Kentucky is inspired by those challenges. He took the initiative to celebrate National Periodic Table Day based upon John Newlands’ first table of the elements published on February 7, 1863.

BUBBLE GUM DAY – First Friday in February

BUBBLE GUM DAY

Celebrating Bubble Gum Day the first Friday of February every year doesn’t burst many people’s bubble. It’s a fun way to chew your favorite flavor of bubble gum, blow some spectacular bubbles and raise money, too.

Bubble Gum Day helps raise money for schools and the charities they support. Students donate 50 cents to be able to chew bubble gum in class on Bubble Gum Day.

Long before any substantial chewing gum formed bubbles, ancient human beings chewed bits of resin from trees. All around the world, people collected substances from the available trees and used them for dental care and general enjoyment.

It wasn’t until 1928 after decades of failure by those before him, and several of his own, that Walter Diemer created the first bubble producing gum. His employer, the Fleer Chewing Gum Company, marketed it as “Dubble Bubble”.

The largest bubble gum bubble ever blown was 50.8 centimeters (20 inches) in diamter. Chad Fell of Haleyville, Alabama blew the bubble with three pieces of Dubble Bubble on April 24, 2004 at Double Springs High School in Winston County, Alabama.

HOW TO OBSERVE #BubbleGumDay

Grab your quarters and bubble gum! It’s time to chew some gum, blow bubbles and raise some money for a good cause.

If your school doesn’t participate, encourage your school to set up a fundraiser. The funds can be donated to a local charity, new band costumes or foreign language emersion trip. Those are just a few ideas to get you started.

Use #BubbleGumDay to share on social media.

BUBBLE GUM DAY HISTORY

In 2006, Ruth Spiro, children’s author and mother, founded the celebration/fundraiser to create a fun way for children to participate in school fundraising.

NATIONAL FETTUCCINE ALFREDO DAY – February 7

NATIONAL FETTUCCINE ALFREDO DAY

On February 7th, National Fettuccine Alfredo Day celebrates one of the world’s favorite ways to enjoy a plate of fettuccine. 

Fettuccine alfredo enjoys a history as rich as its flavor. Created in 1908, fettuccine was made out of love and concern by an Italian restauranteur. Alfredo di Lelio’s concern for his pregnant wife’s lack of appetite caused him to put his talents to work. The birth of their first son depended on it. His recipe of noodles, cheese, and butter not only encouraged her to eat but she also inspired him to put it on the menu, too. Since then, the century-old dish has been satisfying pasta lovers around the world ever since. 

Not only that but fettuccine alfredo lovers experiment with the dish in several ways. Add shrimp, mushrooms or spinach. The meal also pairs well with other vegetables and proteins, too. Cut the richness with a white wine and finish with a fruit dessert. 

HOW TO OBSERVE #FettuccineAlfredoDay

Celebrate with a big dish of fettuccine Alfredo! Invite friends and family to join you, too. As you know, it’s not a celebration if you don’t. Make it yourself (we provide a recipe). Or, go to your favorite Italian restaurant. When you do, be sure to give them a shout out.

Primo Fettuccine Alfredo recipe.

While you’re celebrating, share your photos, recipes, and more using #FettuccineAlfredoDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL FETTUCCINE ALFREDO DAY HISTORY

The earliest printed record of the observance we’ve found is a January 26, 2005, Akron Beacon Journal article listing upcoming February food holidays. Several newspapers across the nation follow suit, including the list in their food pages. But, none of them included their source or how long the day has been celebrated. However, the grandson of Alfredo Di Lelio contacted National Day Calendar in 2015 to provide the history behind the delicious pasta dish. We provide his letter below.

From Ines Di Lelio, grandson of Alfredo di Lelio

The following is the History of Alfredo di Lelio, who created in 1908 “Fettuccine All ‘Alfredo” (Fettuccine Alfredo). It’s now served by his nephew Ines Di Lelio, at the restaurant “Il Vero Alfredo” – “Alfredo Di Roma” in Rome, Piazza Augusto Imperatore 30.

“With reference of your article (for which I thank you), I have the pleasure to tell you the history of my grandfather Alfredo Di Lelio, who is the creator of ‘Fettuccine all’Alfredo’ (‘Fettuccine Alfredo’) in 1908 in the ‘trattoria’ run by his mother Angelina in Rome, Piazza Rosa (Piazza disappeared in 1910 following the construction of the Galleria Colonna / Sordi).

This ‘trattoria’ of Piazza Rosa has become the ‘birthplace of fettuccine all’Alfredo’. More specifically, as is well known to many people who love the ‘fettuccine all’Alfredo’, this famous dish in the world was invented by Alfredo Di Lelio concerned about the lack of appetite of his wife Ines, who was pregnant with my father Armando (born February 26, 1908). Alfredo di Lelio opened his restaurant “Alfredo” in 1914 in Rome and in 1943, during the war, he sold the restaurant to others outside his family.”

Staying in the Family

“In 1950 Alfredo Di Lelio decided to reopen with his son Armando his restaurant in Piazza Augusto Imperatore n.30 ‘Il Vero Alfredo’ (‘Alfredo di Roma’), whose fame in the world has been strengthened by his nephew Alfredo and that now managed by me, with the famous “gold cutlery” (fork and spoon gold) donated in 1927 by two well-known American actors Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks (in gratitude for the hospitality). See also the website of ‘Il Vero Alfredo’.(with news also about franchising).

I celebrate every year (as this year) in my restaurant (founded by my grandfather Alfredo Di Lelio) the USA Holiday of. fettuccine all’Alfredo (February 7). I must clarify that other restaurants “Alfredo” in Rome do not belong to the family tradition of ‘Il Vero Alfredo – Alfredo di Roma’ and I inform you that the restaurant ‘Il Vero Alfredo –Alfredo di Roma’ is in the registry of ‘Historic Shops of Excellence’ of the City of Rome Capitale.

Best regards Ines Di Lelio”

On Deck for February 8, 2020

National Days

     

    Recipe of the Day

    Baby Swiss And Tomato Grilled Cheese Sandwich

    Prep:  5 mins
    Cook:  5 mins
    Total Prep: 10 minutes
    Servings:  1

    Instructions:

    Slice 4 pieces of Baby Swiss, and 3 or 4 slices of ripened tomato.

    Spread one side of each piece of bread with softened butter.

    Heating medium fry pan and place 1 piece of bread buttered side down in pan.

    Cover bread in layers with two pieces of cheese, sliced tomato, and finally second two pieces of cheese. Place second slice of bread buttered side up.

    Turn sandwich occasionally with spatula until bread is toasted and cheese is melted.

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    About National Day Calendar

    National Day Calendar® is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months. In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.

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