DECEMBER 7, 2019 | NATIONAL PEARL HARBOR REMEMBRANCE DAY | NATIONAL COTTON CANDY DAY | NATIONAL RHUBARB VODKA DAY | SKYWARN RECOGNITION DAY | NATIONAL ILLINOIS DAY

NATIONAL PEARL HARBOR REMEMBRANCE DAY – December 7

NATIONAL  PEARL HARBOR REMEMBRANCE DAY

Each year in the United States, National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day honors all those who lost their lives when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. More than 3,500 Americans lost their lives or were wounded on that solemn day.

The day marked a turn in the United States’ position regarding involvement in World War II. The Japanese attack damaged several battleships, permanently sinking both the USS Arizona and USS Oklahoma. Still, others capsized, taking crew members with them. One noted ship was the USS Utah. Along with naval vessels, the attack destroyed aircraft, too. As a result, the attack forced the U.S. into a war that had been raging for two years.

The day is also sometimes referred to as Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day or Pearl Harbor Day.

HOW TO OBSERVE #PearlHarborRemembranceDay

Organizations across the country honor the memory of Pearl Harbor with tributes; survivors share their stories and join in reunions. Traditionally the Flag of the United States is flown at half-staff until sunset to honor those who lost their lives serving this nation at Pearl Harbor. 

Today, Pearl Harbor offers several sites in memory of those who served during the bombing. The Pearl Harbor National Memorial dedicates sites in memory of the crews lost on December 7th, 1941. For many of the crew of the USS Utah, USS Arizona, and USS Oklahoma, Pearl Harbor is their final resting place. The memorials serve as a place of honor to those service members lost during the attack. They also provide a moving reminder of the loss war causes. 

Use #PearlHarborRemembranceDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL PEARL HARBOR REMEMBRANCE DAY HISTORY

On August 23, 1994, the United States Congress by Pub L 103-308, designated December 7th, of each year, as National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.

NATIONAL COTTON CANDY DAY – December 7

NATIONAL COTTON CANDY DAY

National Cotton Candy Day celebrates the spun sugar treat that delights candy fans of all ages. On December 7th get your favorite flavor of this sweet delight that dates back to the 1400s.

Originally called spun sugar, cotton candy is still a staple at carnivals, fairs, and the circus. While it may be reminiscent of childhood days, fairy floss also reminds us of fluffy clouds. Since the heated sugar gets spun into thin strands of fine sugar and blown into fat puffs twirled onto paper sticks, it’s a bit like magic.

We associate it with other magical occasions, too. Carnivals and fairs, the zoo, and the circus delight us. We associate a bit a joy and magic with cotton candy. Nostalgic memories of bustling crowds and the music of the calliope bring a smile to our faces. Cotton candy comes with adventure!

Cotton candy is also called candy floss or fairy floss.

During the 18th century, cotton candy (spun sugar) was first recorded in Europe. At that time, it was very expensive and labor-intensive. Generally, the average person could not afford to purchase cotton candy.  

Then in 1897, Dentist William Morrison and confectioner John C. Wharton invented machine-spun cotton candy. Their invention introduced cotton candy to a wider audience at the 1904 World’s Fair as Fairy Floss. Fairgoers loved it and bought over 68,000 boxes for 25¢ a box.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalCottonCandyDay

Enjoy some cotton candy and use #NationalCottonCandyDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL COTTON CANDY DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar® continues researching the origins of this sweet food holiday.

NATIONAL RHUBARB VODKA DAY – First Saturday in December

NATIONAL RHUBARB VODKA DAY

On National Rhubarb Vodka Day, pour a glass and raise a toast to the unique tartness that rhubarb brings to this versatile spirit. The first Saturday in December each year provides the perfect time to mix a cocktail with your favorite rhubarb vodka. 

Rhubarb Vodka was originally introduced in the United States of America in 2010 by Maple River Distillery in historic downtown Casselton, North Dakota. Rhubarb grows locally and gardeners love it. The idea grew to infuse Rhubarb into Vodka.  The results were an instant hit and the distilled beverage enjoys a growing popularity across the USA.

While many think of rhubarb as a vegetable, it is actually a fruit by law. In 1947, the decision came to a New York court. The court determined that rhubarb is more frequently used as a fruit than a vegetable in the United States. As a result, the court’s determined that for the purposes of duties and regulations that rhubarb would be deemed a fruit.

Just like other spirits, rhubarb vodka is quite versatile. Don’t hesitate to experiment. Combine rhubarb vodka with sparkling wine or soda for that celebratory fizz. Add fresh fruit or rim the glass with sugar or dried herbs. Rhubarb vodka makes a delicious martini, mimosa and cosmopolitan, too.

HOW TO OBSERVE #RhubarbVodkaDay

Pour a glass of rhubarb vodka. Discover cocktail recipes and share your favorites. Be sure to savor the beverage with a friend. It’s always the best way to #CelebrateEveryDay! And when you do, use #NationalRhubarbVodkaDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL RHUBARB VODKA DAY HISTORY

Maple River Distillery founded National Rhubarb Vodka Day in 2013 to celebrate the quick rise of the popular distilled beverage.

SKYWARN RECOGNITION DAY – First Saturday in December

SKYWARN® RECOGNITION DAY

SKYWARN® Recognition Day acknowledges the contributions of public service volunteers who provide essential weather information as it’s happening. Each year on the first Saturday in December, the day honors those volunteers who pay attention when the wind picks up, or the sky turns dark. Their efforts keep their communities safer by communication warnings to the National Weather Service. 

The observance recognizes the vital public service contributions that Amateur Radio operators make during National Weather Service severe weather warning operations. It also strengthens the bond between Amateur Radio operators and the local National Weather Service.

Around the country, nearly 290,000 Skywarn® weather spotters volunteer their time. They identify severe weather that could potentially affect life and property. Spotters warn the National Weather Service of the threat of thunderstorms, tornados, and floods.

Skywarn® spotters complete training through a variety of formats and communicate through amateur radio. As members of their community, they’re vital resources both locally and on a national basis.

HOW TO OBSERVE #SkywarnRecognitionDay

If you are a SKYWARN radio operator, you can participate in SKYWARN Recognition Day by visiting a National Weather Service office or by contacting other radio operators. To learn more about becoming a SKYWARN spotter, go to skywarn.org. Use #SkywarnRecognitionDay to post on social media.

SKYWARN® RECOGNITION DAY HISTORY

The National Weather Service and the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) created SKYWARN Recognition Day in 1999 to recognize the importance that amateur radio provides during severe weather. Many NWS offices acquire real-time weather information from amateur radio operators in the field. These operators, for example, may report the position of a tornado, the height of floodwaters, or damaging wind speeds during hurricanes. All of this information is critical to the mission of the NWS, which is to preserve life and property. The special day celebrates these contributions by amateur radio operators.

For more details, go to:
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mtr/hamradio/

In 2017, National Day Calendar® began celebrating each state in the order they entered the union starting the week of Independence Day and ending with Hawaii. We highlight a small part of each states’ history, foods and the people who make up the state. Many states have their own state celebrations, and National Day Calendar’s observances in no way replace them. There’s so much more to explore, we can’t help but celebrate our beautiful country even more!

National Illinois Day - December 7

 

NATIONAL ILLINOIS DAY

On December 7, National Illinois Day recognizes the Land of Lincoln, home to the Windy City, and fertile prairies.

As the 21st state to join the United States, Illinois’s distinct political, industrial, agricultural and population densities create an intriguing contrast to other states.

When farmers began to settle on the Illinois prairie, they found the thick soil challenging to sow. One Vermont blacksmith made the work easier with the invention of the steel plow that cut sod more efficiently than previous tools. John Deere plow was born.

Railroads and shipping lines grew with farms in the rich prairies as settlers spread across the state. Chicago’s proximity to Lake Michigan has made it a major hub for transportation of goods across the country.

With the invention of the combustion engine, more reliable public highways became a national goal. U.S. Route 66 would become the iconic ribbon from Chicago to Los Angeles. Officially established in 1926, portions of the route were created from already existing roads.

Illinois completed the first leg of Route 66 during an era when Prohibition was in full swing. A paved roadway gave illegal transportation of spirits a bootleg up and the state a reputation that has become legendary for this era.

While Ronald Reagan was the only president born in Illinois, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant and Barack Obama all called Illinois home.

Traveling around the state, we will glimpse the wonders of nature or the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright.  From tours of his architecture in Oak Park to Starved Park State Park and Horseshoe Mound, Illinois offers urban and outdoor enjoyment.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalIllinoisDay

Join National Day Calendar as we recognize Illinois’ history and pioneering spirit. Uncover hidden treasures and explore all Illinois highways and byways! Use #NationalIllinoisDay to share on social media.

On Deck for December 8, 2019

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar® is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months. In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.

There’s a celebration for everyone. While National Road Trip Day satisfies the itch to wander, many pet days let us share our love of animals. National 3-D Day and National Astronaut Day honor the advancement of technology, too. Every food day you can imagine (National Avocado Day, for example), will keep you celebrating, also!

Be sure to stay in the know by signing up for our e-mail updates. Also, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Our Ambassador Program is another way #CelebrateEveryDay®! Whether you become an ambassador or follow one of the savvy ambassadors, their fun videos and posts will keep you prepared for every holiday.

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