Category: November Classroom

  • CLASSROOM – Geography

    CLASSROOM – GEOGRAPHY

    Geography is all around us, in the classroom, our homes, our cities, everywhere! Geography Awareness Week reminds us of all the ways geography impacts our lives. It can create weather patterns or traffic patterns. Geography influences our culture and habits. This week, we take a look at how geography close to us impacts our lives.

    HOW TO OBSERVE in the CLASSROOM – Geography

    Download and print this week’s projects to explore geography. You can also follow the suggestions below to help your students explore the days in their own way. It might surprise you what they discover! We’re often surprised by our own discoveries!

    Celebrate Every Day in the Classroom by:

    1. Asking a question about the day or observance and finding the answer.
    2. Exploring the subject further. Whether you read a book, interview an expert, watch a documentary, or run an experiment, there is always more to learn about the observance.
    3. Writing about the day or observance. You can write about what you learned or what the day means to you.
    4. Telling someone about the day. You might be sharing information that is helpful to someone. Or, you might brighten someone’s day.
    5. Solving a problem. Many observances discuss issues around the world that need fixing. How would you fix it?
    6. Being creative. Draw, paint, build, design, bake, create your idea of what the observance means.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

  • CLASSROOM – Young Readers

    CLASSROOM – Young Readers

    Every classroom is full of young readers and encouraging them to keep reading and learning is one of our most important goals. Beyond telling a story, reading is vital to every facet of a child’s education. This week, we focus on National Young Readers Week celebrating children and their amazing capacity to learn.

    HOW TO OBSERVE in the CLASSROOM – Young Readers

    Download and print this week’s projects for some fun experiments with vinegar. You can also follow the suggestions below to help your students explore the days in their own way. It might surprise you what they discover! We’re often surprised by our own discoveries!

    Celebrate Every Day in the Classroom by:

    1. Asking a question about the day or observance and finding the answer.
    2. Exploring the subject further. Whether you read a book, interview an expert, watch a documentary, or run an experiment, there is always more to learn about the observance.
    3. Writing about the day or observance. You can write about what you learned or what the day means to you.
    4. Telling someone about the day. You might be sharing information that is helpful to someone. Or, you might brighten someone’s day.
    5. Solving a problem. Many observances discuss issues around the world that need fixing. How would you fix it?
    6. Being creative. Draw, paint, build, design, bake, create your idea of what the observance means.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    During Young Readers Week, celebrate with these fun projects:

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

  • CLASSROOM – VINEGAR

    CLASSROOM – VINEGAR

    National Vinegar Day gives classrooms all across the opportunity to experiment. This classroom is no different. In fact, we’ve done vinegar experiments in the classroom before! Not only are they fun to do, but they also teach us so many things. Check out this week’s projects or ones from the past. We list them all here for you to review.

    HOW TO OBSERVE in the CLASSROOM – Vinegar

    Download and print this week’s projects for some fun experiments with vinegar. You can also follow the suggestions below to help your students explore the days in their own way. It might surprise you what they discover! We’re often surprised by our own discoveries!

    Celebrate Every Day in the Classroom by:

    1. Asking a question about the day or observance and finding the answer.
    2. Exploring the subject further. Whether you read a book, interview an expert, watch a documentary, or run an experiment, there is always more to learn about the observance.
    3. Writing about the day or observance. You can write about what you learned or what the day means to you.
    4. Telling someone about the day. You might be sharing information that is helpful to someone. Or, you might brighten someone’s day.
    5. Solving a problem. Many observances discuss issues around the world that need fixing. How would you fix it?
    6. Being creative. Draw, paint, build, design, bake, create your idea of what the observance means.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    While vinegar is the subject of this week’s projects, we also include this week’s Celebration Challenge!

     

     

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

  • CLASSROOM – Absurdity

    CLASSROOM – Absurdity

    What’s this you say? You don’t want any absurdity in your classroom. Well, National Absurdity Day inspires this week’s project and after thinking it over for a little bit, absurdity is just problem solving that went wrong.

    So, this week, it’s time for students to put their thinking caps on and solve some problems. They can be big or small, old or new. We all know there are plenty of problems to solve. They might be right in your classroom or your school. Where ever you find them, students have an opportunity to put their own spin on how to fix problems they might not usually think about.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #FamilyStories

    Download and print the Absurd Problem Solving worksheet for your students. Explore the other resources we’ve included for problem-solving ideas and get to fixing all the absurdity out there!

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    Are you ready to do some solving? I’m being absurd, you say? Well, that’s absurd. Ok, enough absurdity. Let’s get down to business. For this week’s project, you’ll need newspapers or magazines. Students can work on their own or as teams to solve the absurd problems they find in the articles they read. For more ways to include problem-solving in your classroom, visit the websites included below. They offer excellent ideas for engaging students in team-building projects that will prepare them for real-world problems we all face.

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

  • CLASSROOM – Homonyms

    National Day Calendar Classroom - November - Homonyms

    CLASSROOM – Homonyms

    In the Classroom, National Novel Writing Month is a popular project each year, and knowing your homonyms is helpful. This week we take a look at just a few in a way that gives the students an opportunity to be creative while exploring these words. Educators can build their lessons around the coloring page introduce it as a side topic. The page introduces a single homophone, too. Will your students find it?

    HOW TO OBSERVE #FamilyStories

    Download and print the Homophones Coloring for your students. Explore National Novel Writing Month projects with your students to encourage the creativity and benefits of writing skills they will all use the rest of their lives.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECT

    Homonyms are words that are spelled the same and sound the same but have different meanings. When we tell a story, the context of the sentence tells the reader which word we mean. Download and print the homonym coloring page to explore some of these words.

    Homonyms Coloring Page

  • NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – WEEK 16 – November 25, 2018

    NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – WEEK 16 – November 25, 2018

    Wrapping up November in the classroom, we take a look at National Inspirational Role Models Month. Since the Thanksgiving holiday gives the students a couple days with family, there’s an opportunity to discuss the people we admire.

    Students don’t often get the opportunity to find out how someone became a doctor or an artist, a volunteer at Meals on Wheels or a librarian. It might surprise them to hear how some of the important people in their lives became who they are and it might surprise us to find out who our students see as role models. 

    Sharing on social media isn’t required, learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    LESSON 1 – Student Questionnaire

    Discuss with your class what a role model is and who their role models might be. Print off the questionnaire and allow the students to explore the virtues of a role model. Younger students can create a collage from old magazines to illustrate the characteristics and personality their role model should have. This assignment can be a group project or one that’s sent home to work with the parents.  See lesson 2 for more. 

    1. What qualities are necessary for a role model?

    1. Describe the kinds of activities your role model would be involved in.

    1. What kind of temperament does a good role have?

    1. How would your role model handle a difficult situation?

    1. List the role models in your life.

    Lesson 2 – Role Model Questionnaire

    Students interview their role model to learn more about how their inspiration came to be the person they are today.  

    1. Who inspired you to be who you are today?

    1. Did you always want to be a ______________?

    1. How did you become a ____________?

    1. What advice would you give someone who wants to be more like you?

    *** Remember to thank your role model and tell them how they have inspired you.

    [wp_quiz id=”386517″]

  • NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – Week 15 – November 18, 2018

    NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – Week 15 – November 18, 2018

    It’s Thanksgiving week in the classroom, but that doesn’t mean no learning goes on.  National Play Monopoly Day on November 19 inspires several teaching opportunities.   

    For fun, we include trivia, word finds and crossword puzzles featuring days during the week, too. 

    Sharing on social media isn’t required, learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    Lesson 1 – National Play Monopoly Day

    Use the game of Monopoly to develop skills in the classroom. Your gameboard can be designed for social skills, math, science, history, language arts, or modified to fit your needs. 

    • Math – Students progress around the board by completing challenges and collecting rewards for correct answers.
    • Social skills – Challenge students to answer progressively difficult questions regarding social circumstances. Bring the most difficult problems to their peers for debate.
    • Science – Theories and experiments abound as students progress around the board. Is the science sound? Reward them for correct answers and challenge them with chemistry, physics, and biology. 
    • History – Progress from the Wild West to the Modern Age. Who will collect the most knowledge as they travel through time collecting artifacts of the past? Reward students for accurate information. Bonus for earning cards in the same era. 
    • Language – Nouns, verbs, participles, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions and more! Students earn points when they’ve collected enough parts of speech to build a sentence.  
  • NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – Week 14 – November 11, 2018

    NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – WEEK 14 – November 11, 2018

    Heading into week 14, National Day Calendar Classroom gets ready to pucker up during National Pickle Day.  We have an experiment that will dazzle and another that will test the taste buds.  We’ve also included a quick quiz from National Pickle Day for educators to use as bonus points. Students can read the article and take the quiz included in the links below.

    As always, check out the trivia, crosswords and word search puzzles. Each week, we try to bring a variety of activities to celebrate the days on the calendar to keep your classroom curious.

    Sharing on social media isn’t required, learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    LESSON 1 – National Pickle Day

    In the link below, students can create a buzzer out of a pickle by putting an electric current through it.
    Exploratorium Kosher Dill 

    The same concept in the link below shows students how to light up a pickle.
    Steve Spangler – Electric Pickle

    Finally, students take a quiz about pickles.  The answer key is included for our educators.

    Lesson 2 – National Pickle Day taste test

    Dill pickles are sour. It’s the vinegar that makes it that way. Our taste buds are quite sensitive and scientists have determined there are at least 6 different categories of taste. In this test, we will see if your students can identify four basic taste categories – sweet, bitter, sour and salty. Assign students to bring items from each group to share with the class.

    bitter – rind of a lemon or lime, dark chocolate, tomato, cinnamon (no sugar added)

    sweet – apples, sugar candy, pears, grapes

    sour – dill pickles, lemons, limes

    salty – pretzels, saltines, chips, nuts

    You will also need a pencil and paper to chart results.

    Have them taste each item individually then decide which category the food belongs. After each food has been placed in a category, compare results.

  • NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – WEEK 13 – November 4, 2018

    NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – WEEK 13 – November 4, 2018

    As we dive into November, the classroom we also head into the traditional holiday season. While we #CelebrateEveryDay, spending time with family during the holidays means we see people we miss throughout the year. Family Stories Month makes those moments a perfect assignment for the classroom, too!

    This week, we also look back to the STEM/STEAM project for more classroom science fun.

    Be sure to check out the trivia, crosswords and word search puzzles. Each week, we try to bring a variety of activities to celebrate the days on the calendar to keep your classroom curious.

    Sharing on social media isn’t required, learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    Lesson 1 – Family Stories Month

    This week, students interview family members to find out family history or learn more about a specific family member. Students may use this list of starter questions or come up with their own. These questions may help generate stories from family members. Students may have to listen carefully to the responses and ask follow up questions to help get the story going.

    1. Where were you born?
    2. What was your dream when you were a child?
    3. What was your earliest memory?
    4. Who was your first friend?
    5. What was your first job?
    6. What’s the longest trip you ever took in a car?
    7. Have you ever been to another country?
    8. Who is the most famous person you’ve ever met?
    9. What is the thing you are most proud of doing?
    10. Can you play a musical instrument?
    11. Where were you when President Kennedy was shot?
    12. What’s your favorite homecooked meal?
    13. Have you ever been to Washington, DC?
    14. Can you swim?

     

    LESSON 2 – Family Stories Month

    Our adult family members aren’t the only people who have stories to tell. As part of the family, children have stories to tell, too. Encourage families to allow children the opportunity to tell stories about their adventures while family surrounds them. Storytelling and oral history as a tradition are being lost. Sharing this with our children and teaching them how to pass along oral histories benefits them by building confidence and improving their language skills.  It also impacts their memory and creativity.

    While oral storytelling takes on the role of the history teacher, it also entertains. There’s an excitement to the tale and an anticipation that builds. By encouraging students to participate in telling their stories, we’re asking them to explore their language and expand their experiences. We’re also asking them to consider the perspectives of the other people in their stories. They must remember, they aren’t the only characters in their adventures. What are the cause and effect of their actions? Were there consequences and what were the rewards? All of these come into the realm of storytelling and result in the children learning the morals of their own stories.

    Ask parents to interview their children and record their answers.  We’ve included a student questionnaire for you to use.

    1. How do you make cereal?
    2. What’s the best way to get to (fill in the name of someone the child enjoys going to see)’s house?
    3. Who drives the car best and why?
    4. If you could travel anywhere in the world where would it be and why?
    5. What are the ingredients in chocolate chip cookies?
    6. What do you dream about when you fall asleep?
    7. How do you catch snowflakes?
    8. What was your favorite day ever?

     

  • NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – Week 12 – November 26 – December 2

    NATIONAL DAY CALENDAR CLASSROOM – Week 12 – November 26 – December 2

    Wrapping up the month of November and entering the last month of the year, the classroom looks to history for our lesson.

    On December 1, Rosa Parks Day remembers a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement.  Long before the day Rosa Parks lit a spark under the movement, other men and women believed in the right to equal rights for all men and women.  Many of these citizens won’t be found in history books, but newspaper articles, encyclopedias, and case law remember them.  Challenge your students to find them.

    The history books remember Frederick Douglass, Rosa Parks, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B Anthony. All provided valuable momentum to their civil rights movements.  Their perseverance, powerful abilities to speak before crowds and dedication made considerable inroads to break down barriers such as segregation and myths about allowing the right to vote for all citizens.

    One name lost to history is Elizebeth Jennings Graham.  A summary of her story can be found on National New York Day, but she is not the only activist to make contributions to causes.  There are many important stories.  Have students use their research skills in the library and see what their sleuthing skills find!

    VOCABULARY

    civil rights – the rights of personal liberties to political, social, and legal equalities.

    suffrage – the right of a citizen to vote in an election

    segregation – setting apart or separating a group of people from the main body or group.

    citizen – legally recognized member of nation or state; naturalized or native.