Category: March 16

  • ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE KIDS DAY – Third Thursday in March

    ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE KID DAY®

    Every year on the third Thursday in March, Absolutely Incredible Kids Day encourages adults to tell kids how absolutely incredible they are. Take the challenge a step further and WRITE it down in a letter to that absolutely incredible kid.

    Children are amazing creatures. Their ability to learn, adapt and bring joy to the world is never-ending. Did you ever receive something in the mail as a child? Maybe it was a birthday card or a letter from grandma. Do you remember your face lighting up like a summer’s day? Of course, it did! Just the act of receiving a letter just for them makes a child feel important. And when the letter tells them just how amazing they are or how someone noticed the kind deed they did, receiving a letter becomes an even bigger reward.

    Take out a piece of paper and write down all the ways a child in your life shines. Tell them in a personal letter how much you appreciate them. Encourage them to keep doing big things, and they will change the world!

    HOW TO OBSERVE #AbsolutelyIncredibleKidDay

    • Tell the kids in your life why you think they are incredible, amazing, inspiring, or just plain terrific!
    • Make them feel even more important and write it down in a letter. How many kids do you know? They all deserve some encouragement, so make sure they get it from you.
    • Create a post about an amazing child you know.
    • Catch a child in the act of doing something incredible.
    • Let them overhear you giving them some praise.
    • Use #AbsolutelyIncredibleKidDay to share stories about amazing kids on social media.

    ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE KID DAY HISTORY

    In 1996, Camp Fire launched Absolutely Incredible Kid Day encouraging adults and organizations to support a letter-writing campaign that tells kids just how absolutely incredible they are.

    Absolutely Incredible Kid FAQ

    Q. Can anyone participate on this day?
    A. Yes. While you might not have kids of your own, everyone knows an incredible kid. It may be a niece or nephew, the neighbor, your best friend or co-worker’s child, or a member of your church.

    Q. What do I say to an absolutely incredible kid?
    A. Tell an absolutely incredible kid why you think they’re absolutely incredible. Some things that make absolutely incredible kids are:

    • Positive – Some kids see the bright side of any situation. This kind of approach to life will serve them well!
    • Kind – These kids go out of their way to be helpful and always have a kind word for others.
    • Intelligent – Ever meet someone who amazes you with their ability to understand complex subjects? They are absolutely incredible kids, too.
    • Teachers – These are the kids who love to show others how to be better. It may be teaching someone younger to do a layup or helping with math homework. Either way, they’re absolutely incredible!
    • Volunteers – On Saturday mornings, these kids are out helping others, their community, and classmates.
    • Leaders – They rally a diverse group of their peers to do just about anything.
    • Strong – Despite trials in their life, these kids endure and persevere.
  • NATIONAL CURL CRUSH DAY – March 16

    NATIONAL CURL CRUSH DAY

    National Curl Crush Day on March 16th empowers everyone to be their own curl crush by loving and showing off their natural, gorgeous curls.

    We’ve all done it, flipped through a magazine or scrolled through social media, and secretly wished our hair was different. In fact, 75%* have wished for a different texture and 82%* of women admit to curl envy. That’s why the time is now to flip the script and start crushing on your own curls. National Curl Crush Day on March 16th is a day that’s all about you and every single one of your bouncy, zigzagged curls and coils.

    *Survey conducted in February 2021, amongst 100 Black women.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalCurlCrushDay

    • Join the movement. Celebrate on March 16th by showing off your beautiful curls in all their glory on social media.
    • Use #NationalCurlCrushDay and #CurlCrush.
    • Tag @CarolsDaughter in your post.
    • Invite others with curly hair to join the celebration.
    • Share your photos and stories using #NationalCurlCrushDay on social media.

    NATIONAL CURL CRUSH DAY HISTORY

    Carol's Daughter logo CD - National Curl Crush Day

    Carol’s Daughter founded National Curl Crush Day in 2021 to encourage women to stop wishing for someone else’s curls and instead be their own curl crush! They’re on a mission to celebrate and empower everyone to embrace and show off their beautiful, natural hair.

    The Registrar at National Day Calendar proclaimed the first National Curl Crush Day to be observed on March 16, 2021, annually.

    Curl Crush FAQ

    Q. What causes curly hair?
    A. First, curly hair is a dominant genetic trait. Those genes dictate the shape of the hair follicle. Curly hair is created by oval hair follicles. The flatter the follicle, the curlier the hair.

    Q. Are there different types of curly hair?
    A. Yes, curls types vary from wavy to kinky, tight curls, and everything in between.

  • NATIONAL PANDA DAY – March 16

    NATIONAL PANDA DAY

    On March 16, National Panda Day draws attention to one of the world’s unique bears. Pandas are also one of the world’s most endangered and adored animals. Conservationists and animal lovers alike spread the word about increasing efforts of the international community dedicated to protecting and restoring habitat.

    Native to China, giant pandas are members of the Bear (Ursidae) family. Their rapidly shrinking habitat is a major cause for concern. As an endangered species, successful panda breeding programs are rare. In the wild, there are approximately only 1,864 (according to the World Wide Fund for Nature) and 100 living in zoos around the world.

    With their white face and black eyes and body, panda bears are easily identifiable. However, their black and white coloring was designed for their natural habitat. They disappear into the snowy mountains and temperate forests of southwest China. And despite their sweet disposition, they tend to isolate themselves in the wild. They eat mostly plants and do not hibernate in the winter like many other bears.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalPandaDay

    • Share your love for pandas! You can do that by learning more about them and supporting panda sanctuaries.
    • Promote ways to protect their shrinking habitat.
    • Support breeding and research programs.
    • Watch a documentary about pandas.
      • Director Lu Chuan filmed Born in China. It follows not only a panda family but also golden savvy monkeys and the snow leopard.
      • Drew Fellman and David Douglas direct Pandas. Researchers from the Chengdu Research Base for Giant Panda Breeding seek to take the program to a whole new level. Actress Kristen Bell narrates.
    • Use #NationalPandaDay on social media.

    NATIONAL PANDA DAY HISTORY

    National Day Calendar continues to research the origins of this wildlife holiday.

    Panda FAQ

    Q. Do pandas only eat bamboo?
    A. No. Panda bears also forage for certain kinds of vegetables and grains. They will also eat eggs and small animals like carnivores do. Perhaps the most surprising thing they eat is carrion.

    Q. Do pandas have thumbs?
    A. No but they do have an enlarged wrist bone that functions much like a thumb.

    Q. Do pandas climb trees?
    A. Yes. They also swim.

    Q. Do pandas hibernate?
    A. Unlike other bears, pandas do not hibernate.

  • NATIONAL FARM RESCUER DAY – Third Thursday in March

    NATIONAL FARM RESCUER DAY

    National Farm Rescuer Day dedicates the third Thursday of March to those who support farmers in need.

    When crisis strikes in the form of illness, injury or natural disaster, Farm Rescuers throughout the heartland get the jobs done. Whether seeds need planting, hay needs to be baled or crops need to be harvested, these men and women labor in the fields and feed the souls of the farm family when times take a turn for the worse.

    What was once a community tradition is now a non-profit called Farm Rescue. Founded in 2005, Farm Rescue and its volunteers have assisted nearly 800 farm and ranch families throughout the region. The day encourages you to join the community that lends a hand when crisis strikes.

    Whether a Farm Rescuer volunteers their time, talents or financial resources, their commitment is valuable. Keeping a farm running is hard work. When the unexpected happens, many hands make the work manageable. There are several ways to get involved with Farm Rescue and make a difference on National Farm Rescuer Day.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #FarmRescuerDay

    NATIONAL FARM RESCUER DAY HISTORY

    Farm Rescue founded National Farm Rescuer Day in 2017 to recognize all the amazing men and women who help get the crops in the ground or to the market from all around the country. It’s also an opportunity to give thanks to the many individual donors, business sponsors and grantors who make the organization’s mission possible. Founded by Bill Gross in 2005, Farm Rescue has helped nearly 800 families across the region. In 2008, People Magazine named Farm Rescue’s Founder and President, Bill Gross, the original Farm Rescuer. Like Gross, many Rescuers have a deep appreciation for the land and the strong community spirit found in farming and ranching. But, Farm Rescuers come from all walks of life, from coast to coast and often generations removed from the family farm.

    The Registrar at National Day Calendar®  declared the day to be celebrated annually on the third Thursday of March.

    Farm Rescuer FAQ

    Q. Where has Farm Rescue helped?
    A. Farm Rescuers have impacted farms in six Midwest states including:

    • North Dakota
    • Montana
    • Minnesota
    • South Dakota
    • Nebraska
    • Iowa
    • Kansas

    Q. Do you have to be a farmer to volunteer for Farm Rescue?
    A. No. In fact, according to Dan Erdmann, Farm Rescue’s program manager, volunteers come from diverse backgrounds.

  • NATIONAL ARTICHOKE HEARTS DAY – March 16

    NATIONAL ARTICHOKE HEARTS DAY

    On March 16th, National Artichoke Hearts Day offers a tasty option to add flavor to any dish. 

    According to the California Artichoke Advisory Board, artichokes are a good source of antioxidants, vitamin C, folate, and magnesium. The antioxidants in artichokes are very good for your liver and help promote healthy skin.  Artichokes are also high in fiber, calcium, and protein while low in calories. These reasons, plus being fat-free and cholesterol-free, make artichokes a healthy and delicious food to celebrate!

    • The total antioxidant capacity of an artichoke flower head is one of the highest reported for vegetables.
    • The fleshy base of the artichoke is perhaps the most enjoyably edible part of this oddly-shaped vegetable. 
    • California is known as the artichoke capital of the world. They supply nearly 100% of North American fresh artichokes.

    While artichokes may be a little difficult to prepare, you can find artichoke hearts packed in vinegar, oil, or marinade. Don’t let the artichoke heart fool you. They’re more versatile than they seem. Eat them as a snack or add them to dips or sauces. They also make excellent toppings on pizzas and flatbread. Toss them into the skillet for a savory sauté or infuse them into a broth. Artichoke hearts just might turn into a healthy addition to your cooking routine!

    HOW TO OBSERVE #ArtichokeHeartsDay

    • Pick up some fresh artichokes or canned artichoke hearts to make your favorite recipes.
    • Test out a few new recipes with friends and family. Be sure to save and share your best ones.
    • We offer a few techniques for you to try with your artichoke hearts, too.
      • Roast artichoke hearts with your potatoes and carrots. Season them lightly with olive oil and salt and pepper.
      • Try grilling fresh artichoke hearts for a smoky addition to your meal.
      • Create an artichoke salad or an artichoke dressing.
      • Make an artichoke heart and grilled cheese sandwich with smoked provolone.
      • Warm up with this Lemony Artichoke Soup.
      • Another hearty recipe is this Artichoke Hearts Gratin.
      • Make a variety of dips and sauces, too.
    • Use #ArtichokeHeartsDay to post on social media.

    NATIONAL ARTICHOKE HEARTS DAY HISTORY

    National Day Calendar continues researching the origins of this food holiday. 

    Artichoke Hearts FAQ

    Q. Do artichoke hearts come canned?
    A. Yes. Artichoke hearts can be canned or jarred.

    Q. Can I put artichoke hearts on a salad?
    A. Yes. Artichoke hearts are a delicious addition to salads.

    Q. How many calories are in an artichoke heart?
    A. One 13.75 ounce can of artichoke hearts has 140 calories.

     

    March 16th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

    1802

    President Thomas Jefferson signs the Military Peace Establishment Act establishing the Army Corps of Engineers and the United States Military Academy known as West Point.

    1827

    Editors Samuel E. Cornish and John B. Russwurm publish the first issue of Freedom’s Journal in New York City. The newspaper is the first in the United States owned and operated by African Americans.

    1850

    Ticknor, Reed & Fields publishes Nathaniel Hawthorn’s historical fiction set in colonial America, The Scarlet Letter.

    1926

    It is rocket science. Robert Goddard launched the first liquid-fueled rocket in the United States. The launch took place in a field in Auburn, Massachusetts. Goddard’s experiment led to modern rocket propulsion that makes space flight possible, and that’s why NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland is named in his honor.

    March 16th Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

    James Madison – 1751

    Considered the “Father of the Constitution,” James Madison served two terms from 1809 to 1817. During his terms, tensions between the French and British increased over trade. By 1812, the country was at war, one that destroyed the wreaked havoc on the new capital for most of Madison’s second term.

    Rebecca Cole – 1846

    Dr. Rebecca Cole, the second African American woman to earn her medical degree, graduated from the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1867. She gained further experience at the Infirmary for Woman and Children in New York, established by Elizabeth Blackwell. Cole’s career would span 50 years, serving as an advocate and a champion for her community.

    Jurgis Bielinis – 1846

    Between 1864 and 1904, Tsarist Russian ruled most of Lithuania. When the government attempted to eradicate the Lithuanian language and instituted a press ban to force Lithuanians to assimilate to the Russian language, Jurgis Bielinis and others like him stepped in. Bielinis organized a network of smugglers who brought books, newspapers, and other periodicals in the Lithuanian language across the border. Today, Lithuania celebrates March 16th as the Day of the Book Smugglers in his honor.

    Patricia Ryan Nixon – 1912

    The 39th First Lady took on the role when Richard Nixon took the oath of office on January 20, 1969. She is in good company as the fourth of six educators among the first ladies.

    Jerry Lewis – 1926

    “The King of Comedy” kept audiences laughing for more than eight decades. In the 1950s, Lewis began raising money for muscular dystrophy. The event grew into an annual televised event known as the MDA Labor Day Telethon. He hosted the televised event for 44 years.

    Vladimir Komarov – 1927

    In October 1964, the Soviet test pilot and cosmonaut commanded the first spaceflight to carry multiple crew members, the Voskhod 1. Komarov died tragically on April 24, 1967, during his second mission aboard the Soyuz 1 upon re-entry when the spacecraft’s parachute failed to deploy. He is the first casualty of space exploration.

    C Vivian Stringer – 1948

    For more than a quarter of a century, C. Vivian Stringer made 17 NCAA Tournament visits as the Rutgers Scarlet Knights Women’s Basketball head coach.

    Notable Mentions

    Louise McPhetridge von Thaden – 1929
    Carol O’Brien Sobieski – 1939
    Chuck Woolery – 1941
    Erik Estrada – 1949
    Alice Hoffman – 1952
    Michael J. Bloomfield – 1959
    William Jonathan Drayton Jr – 1959

  • NATIONAL EVERYTHING YOU DO IS RIGHT DAY – March 16

    NATIONAL EVERYTHING YOU DO IS RIGHT DAY

    On March 16th let National Everything You Do Is Right Day correct all the wrong of March 15th. We know that day may have been a difficult day as it was National Everything You Think is Wrong Day. But this holiday, you get to feel good about everything that you do.

    You can use the printer and everything will print beautifully. No typos, no duplicate paragraphs, and just the right number of copies. All the children will make their practices on time. You will pass exams with flying colors. If there’s a problem, you’ll be right about the solution and fix the problem. Tell right jokes. Like this one:

    Knock, knock.
    Who’s there?
    Owls go.
    Owls go who?
    That’s right!

    On National Everything You Do Is Right Day, you can be right, even when you take a left turn. 

    HOW TO OBSERVE #EverythingYouDoIsRightDay

    • Test out a theory and declare your rightness no matter what.
    • Guess how many jellybeans are in that jar!
    • Take up plumbing. You know you’ve always been right about that leaky faucet.
    • Talk politics with your dad just one more time. (Remember, everything he does is right, too.)
    • Start celebrating every day. (That is the most right thing to do on this list!)
    • Turn over a new leaf. Literally. Find a new leaf and just turn it over. Let us know what’s on the other side. 
    • Open a new pickle jar. You can do it, and it won’t be wrong.
    • Use #EverythingYouDoIsRightDay to post on social media.

    NATIONAL EVERYTHING YOU DO IS RIGHT DAY HISTORY

    National Day Calendar continues to research the origins of this right-minded kind of day. However, we think we’re on the right track. But we might be wrong. 

    Right FAQ

    Q. Do I go right or left at Albuquerque?
    A. That’s right!

    Q. Is there any way to win an argument?
    A. Yes. Be right.

  • NATIONAL FREEDOM OF INFORMATION DAY – March 16

    NATIONAL FREEDOM OF INFORMATION DAY

    March 16th recognizes National Freedom of Information Day annually during Sunshine Week. It also commemorates the birthday of President James Madison.  

    Madison earned the name the Father of the Constitution and was the foremost advocate for openness in government. Additionally, historians hail Madison as instrumental in drafting the United States Constitution and the leading advocate and author of the Bill of Rights. Madison held individual rights and freedom of information in high importance.

    • On March 16, 1751, James Madison, Jr. was born in Port Conway, Virginia. Madison died on June 28, 1836, on his Montpelier Estate.
    • The people elected James Madison as the 4th President of the United States of America (1809-1817).
    • In 1966, Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act into law.

    The day reminds us that the Freedom of Information Act offers us a tool to keep us informed. While a request can be made for any record, personal records require permission from the party in question.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #FreedomOfInformationDay

    • Check out the FAQ from FOIA.gov.
    • Learn more about the Freedom of Information Act and how it impacts your rights. Visit the FOIA.gov website to read more about the act.
    • Exercise your rights to access certain unrestricted documents.
    • Learn how to access and request records.
    • Learn more about James Madison, his presidency, and his work for the young United States. For example:
      • Read the Federalist Papers
      • Visit the James Madison Museum of Orange County in Orange, Virginia
      • Watch A More Perfect Union (1989), told from the viewpoint of James Madison. 
    • Be sure to invite others to learn with you. As you know, it’s best to Celebrate Every Day with others! Use #FreedomOfInformationDay to post on social media.

    NATIONAL FREEDOM OF INFORMATION DAY HISTORY

    Jim Bohannon, a nationally syndicated radio talk show host on the Westwood 1 stations, founded National Freedom of Information Day. U.S. Government websites recognize and document this day as well.    

    Freedom of Information FAQ

    Q. When was the Freedom of Information Act made into law?
    A. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the legislation into law on July 4, 1966.

    Q. Why does the FOIA website suggest doing research before requesting documents?
    A. Many documents are already published by the agency in charge of that information and are publicly available.