Category: July 17

  • NATIONAL GET OUT OF THE DOGHOUSE DAY – Third Monday in July

    National Get Out of the Doghouse Day | Third Monday in July
    National Get Out of the Doghouse Day | Third Monday in July

    NATIONAL GET OUT OF THE DOGHOUSE DAY

    Occasionally, we all need a free pass. National Get Out of the Doghouse Day on the third Monday in July offers the fast track home we all need once in a while. 

    #GetOutOfTheDoghouseDay

    Generally, when you are “in the doghouse,” you have fallen out of favor with someone, usually your spouse or significant other. However, you can also be “in the doghouse” with a friend or your boss at work. This day uses all those good cliches to get you back in the big house where you belong.  

    Here are some tips to get “out of the doghouse.”

    • Put down the technology   If this is on your naughty list, don’t use email, texting, or other technology to apologize. A face to face or handwritten apology is best.
    • Meet at a favorite coffee house –  The purpose here is to start talking. Listen to what the other person has to say and do not be judgmental or defensive. Find out why you are “in the doghouse” and give suggestions on how you can improve or fix the issue.
    • Send flowers, chocolates, or an appropriate gift – Include a hand-written note about how you are committed to fixing the issue. Do this AFTER you have already spoken. You will win extra brownie points as this will be unexpected. (Brownies will garner additional points, too!)

    HOW TO OBSERVE NATIONAL GET OUT OF THE DOGHOUSE DAY

    Whoever is in the doghouse, let ’em out. The day pardons their transgression. However, if you’re in the doghouse, any or all of the above-suggested tips would be acceptable. Share your best methods for your ability to #GetOutOfTheDoghouseDay on social media. Help a person out!

    You might need a bit of guidance on making an apology. If so, we offer 7 Steps to a Genuine Apology to help you out. 

    NATIONAL GET OUT OF THE DOGHOUSE DAY HISTORY

    Heidi Richards Mooney of Ft. Lauderdale, FL founded National Get Out of the Doghouse Day in 1999.

    DATES:
    18 July 2022
    17 July 2023
    15 July 2024
    21 July 2025
    20 July 2026
    19 July 2027
    17 July 2028
    16 July 2029
    15 July 2030

     

  • NATIONAL LOTTERY DAY – July 17

    NATIONAL LOTTERY DAY | JULY 17

    If you feel extra lucky on July 17th, it might be because it’s National Lottery Day! Celebrate the way lotteries contribute to local and state programs.

    #NationalLotteryDay

    Lotteries date back to the 15th century. While early lotteries funded village needs by feeding and clothing the poor, they also strengthened defenses. According to Random Riches author, Manfred Zollinger, one of the oldest lotteries dates back to 1441 in Bruges, Belgium.

    In early lotteries, merchants paid for the chance to win money prizes. Often, the grand prizes included the tax farm on the wijnscrooderschap (wine transporters). These early Renaissance lotteries granted one grand prize winner the opportunity to own the tax farm. Their winnings also included quality control of the wine. There’s no question, merchants gained a lucrative position if they won this lottery.

    In the United States, early lotteries paid for cannons during the American Revolution. Lottery money also paved roads up and down the East Coast. Today, states own and operate the lotteries. The funds they gather support government programs and the communities they serve.

    HOW TO OBSERVE NATIONAL LOTTERY DAY

    The day encourages local and state lotteries to offer special promotions on July 17th. Celebrate the contributions provided by lotteries in each of their regions. Watch for promotions in the lottery nearest you.  Use #NationalLotteryDay to share on social media.

    Lottery Day LogoNATIONAL LOTTERY DAY HISTORY 

    Massachusetts State Lottery founded National Lottery Day in 2018 to provide consumers with a day of special promotions for lottery products. Since selling their first ticket in 1972, the Massachusetts State Lottery has been an essential source of unrestricted local aid in the Commonwealth.

    The Registrar at National Day Calendar proclaimed the day to be observed on July 17th annually.

     

  • NATIONAL TATTOO DAY – July 17

    NATIONAL TATTOO DAY | JULY 17

    National Tattoo Day on July 17th recognizes the history, culture, and artists dedicated to etching ink permanently on the skin. The day might just be the date to get that ink you’ve been contemplating.

    #NationalTattooDay

    Evidence of humans marking their bodies with permanent designs have existed for thousands of years. Egyptian and ice mummies reveal several forms of religious and status symbols.

    The word “tattoo” is derived from the Polynesian language for tatau, which means “to tap or to mark.” Around the world, cultures surrounding tattooing vary, and some have changed very little over time. In the United States, sailors brought tattooing to coastal shores from their island exploits.

    Getting inked continues to grow as technology and acceptance increase. While age, gender, religion, and class once divide the tattooed from the non-tattooed, those barriers are less common than they used to be. The reasons why we go under the needle differ, too. A tattoo may represent a significant event or hold intensely personal meaning. However, some people do get tattoos on a whim. Still, others confess, the need for a new tattoo is an addiction.

    As the art form increases in popularity, considering a few things before getting a tattoo is essential:

    Getting a Tattoo
    • Research and find a reputable artist. Remember, this art is permanent. You will want a polished finished piece with no regerts – that is, no regrets.
    • Once you’ve found an artist, be sure you have a design in mind. If you aren’t an artist, pulling an idea from your head and making it a reality will take time to develop.
    • Check spelling. Fact check. If you use a foreign word or a quote in your design, research the meaning and check the spelling. The same applies to symbols. Just because a website translated a meaning or said symbol represented peace or love in a specific culture, doesn’t mean it’s true. And it’s not the artist’s responsibility to know either. Sometimes the design means something altogether different to the client.
    • Be prepared to be placed on a waiting list. Good artists are in demand.
    • You will pay more for good art. Nobody wants a lousy tattoo.
    Day of Your Appointment
    • Clear your day, especially if you’re getting a large tattoo.
    • Arrive on time. Most artists charge by the hour, and any adjustment throws their entire day off. You can’t rush good art.
    • Dress comfortably. You will be sitting or lying in a fixed position for long periods of time.
    • Eat something. A protein bar won’t make you feel stuffed but will keep you alert and satisfied throughout the session.
    • Bring water and stay hydrated.
    • Tip your artists when the session is over.

    HOW TO OBSERVE NATIONAL TATTOO DAY

    Take some time to thank your tattoo artist. Do you have a new design? July 17th is the day to share your design.  Use #NationalTattooDay to share on social media.

    NATIONAL TATTOO DAY HISTORY

    National Tattoo Day has been observed since 2016. However, National Day Calendar continues researching the origins of the day.

  • WORLD EMOJI DAY – July 17

    WORLD EMOJI DAY | JULY 17

    July 17th recognizes World Emoji Day and many of the world’s symbolic icons for digital calendars. The day encourages us to use emojis to send unique messages.

    #WorldEmojiDay

    Before the emoji, there were emoticons. Emoticons (emotion + icon) was developed as an expression of emotions in the cold hard texts that were devoid of them.

    Emoji, a Japanese expression, roughly means “picture word” and was created by Shigetaka Kurita in 1990. While working for the Japanese telecom company NTT Docomo, Kurita would design these picture words as a feature on their pagers to make them more appealing to teens.

    The release of the first iPhone by Apple in 2007 had an emoji keyboard embedded into the phone to nab the Japanese market. While not intended for U.S. users to find, they did and quickly figured out how to use it.

    Every year new emojis (both emoji and emojis are acceptable plural forms of the word) are developed. The emojipedia.org keeps track of all the emoji updates across all platforms and operating systems. Over 1800 emojis cover much more than just emotions. From transportation, food, an assortment of wild and domesticated animals to social platforms, weather, and bodily functions, emojis virtually speak for themselves.

    When it comes to celebration emojis, the designers created a variety to make sure we could express our excitement. Whether we celebrate the arrival of a new baby, an anniversary, or a birthday, there’s something for every celebration. In fact, if we search our emojis carefully, we could probably Celebrate Every Day® on National Day Calendar® emoji style.

    HOW TO OBSERVE WORLD EMOJI DAY

    2016 LogoExplore emojis.  Emoji (1)Send them to your friends.  Seeif they Heartit!  Use #WorldEmojiDay to share on social media.

    WORLD EMOJI DAY HISTORY

    In 2014, Emojipedia founder Jeremy Burge created World Emoji Day.  The date of July 17th has been intrinsic to the iconic red and black Apple calendar emoji since its launch in 2002.

     

  • NATIONAL YELLOW PIG DAY – July 17

    NATIONAL YELLOW PIG DAY | JULY 17

    National Yellow Pig Day on July 17th honors the unique attributes of the number 17 and its significance to mathematics. 

    #NationalYellowPigDay

    If you don’t think the number 17 plays any role in our lives, consider these facts:

    • The number 17 is a premium number in the arena of prime numbers. Add the first four prime numbers together, and 17 is their sum.
    • The average school bus weighs 17 tons with passengers inside.
    • Each of the following words has 17 letters:
      • interdisciplinary
      • telecommunication
      • misinterpretation
      • commercialization
      • electrophotometer
    • The atomic number of chlorine is 17.
    • Pebble Beach has a specific road known as the 17 Mile Drive along the Monterey Peninsula in California. However, the exact length of the road is 16.78 miles.
    • The 17th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution gave the citizens of the United States the right to elect their senators by popular vote. Before the states ratified the amendment on April 8, 1913, each states’ legislature would elect the senators to Congress.

    Look for the not so random occurrence of the number 17.  Look!  Yellow pig!

    HOW TO OBSERVE NATIONAL YELLOW PIG DAY

    Brush up on your calculus and round up your yellow pigs. Look for the number 17. It’s everywhere! We even have more ideas to help you celebrate:

    • See how many times you find the number 17 in the newspaper on July 17.
    • Do 17 jumping jacks.
    • Order a round of drinks for 17 people (you big spender, you).
    • Eat 17 spoonfuls of Peach Ice Cream.
    • Buy 17 lottery tickets.
    • Get 17 tattoos a number 17 tattoo.

    While you’re celebrating, be sure to post on social media using #NationalYellowPigDay.

    NATIONAL YELLOW PIG DAY HISTORY

    Our research found National Pig Day originates sometime during the early 1960s. Two mathematicians by the name of Michael Spivak and David Kelly were analyzing the random properties of the number 17 and a mysterious yellow pig. It seems the process became excessive and professional. Kelly gave lectures and taught classes around Yellow Pig, and Spivak made publications in several mathematics texts. While not based upon it, Spivak does subtly reference the number 17 and Yellow Pig.

     

  • NATIONAL WRONG WAY CORRIGAN DAY – July 17

    NATIONAL WRONG WAY CORRIGAN DAY | JULY 17

    National Wrong Way Corrigan Day on July 17th commemorates the transatlantic flight of an Irish-American stunt pilot from Galveston, Texas. Douglas Corrigan (January 22, 1907 – December 9, 1995) gained notoriety for an unplanned transatlantic flight to Ireland on July 17, 1938. 

    #WrongWayCorriganDay

    Growing up as a boy, Douglas Corrigan’s fascination with flight was not uncommon. Charles Lindbergh’s transatlantic flight may have been the most impressionable moment in his young life. In 1938, the young stunt pilot flew from his home in California to New York. Upon his arrival, he asked for permission to duplicate his hero’s historic flight. Unfortunately, the flight service quickly denied his request due to the age of his 1929 Curtiss Robin aircraft. 

    With only a magnetic compass, Corrigan advised officials he was returning to California. According to the story, after takeoff, cloud cover prevented Corrigan from accurate navigation. When Corrigan dropped below the clouds hours later, he saw nothing but water. Then Corrigan realized his navigation was off. Despite the confusion, he continued on his journey. Surprisingly, 28 hours later, he landed in Ireland. 

    Corrigan’s story of his flight never faltered. Despite accusations that he secretly planned this flight, Corrigan held fast to his original explanation.

    After the Flight

    The wayward pilot wrote about his misadventure in his memoir, That’s My Story. While out of print, you can find a few copies for the right price. Corrigan also received a movie deal and soon played himself in The Flying Irishman. During World War II, he tested bombers. After the war, the stunt man toured the country with other familiar war heroes in parades. As the notoriety died down, Corrigan settled into a quiet life with his wife and family. Occasionally fame would catch up to him again when Corrigan would run into a reporter who wanted to question the veracity of his story.  

    HOW TO OBSERVE NATIONAL WRONG WAY CORRIGAN

    Explore the history of transatlantic flight and more stories like Douglas Corrigan’s. Watch The Flying Irishman or visit an air museum. Use #WrongWayCorriganDay to share on social media. Explore these other 8 Amazing Firsts in Flight, too!

    NATIONAL WRONG WAY CORRIGAN DAY HISTORY

    National Wrong Way Corrigan Day originates with the date Corrigan left New York in 1938. The first celebration took place in 1987 when Long Island commemorated the 49th anniversary of Corrigan’s flight. The city hosted a parade in honor of the 80-year-old pilot. The celebration was given the name “Wrong Way Corrigan Day.” In 1992, Corrigan’s hometown of Galveston, Texas, also proclaimed Wrong Way Corrigan Day. They chose the date of January 22nd, celebrating their hometown hero’s birthday.  

     

  • NATIONAL PEACH ICE CREAM DAY – July 17

    Peach Ice Cream Day | July 17
    Peach Ice Cream Day | July 17

    NATIONAL PEACH ICE CREAM DAY | JULY 17

    National Peach Ice Cream Day on July 17th sweetens the day with a few scoops at the peak of peach season. 

    #PeachIceCreamDay

    Since peaches begin peaking in July, this celebration comes just in time. It also lands right in the middle of National Ice Cream Month. So, it’s an excellent time to add peach ice cream to the growing list of flavors to choose from when it comes to frozen, creamy treats. 

    Generally speaking, there are two types of peaches – freestone and clingstone. The difference has to do with how the flesh comes away from the stone or the pit in the middle of the peach. When the meat comes away freely from the stone, the peach is a freestone peach; if the flesh clings to it, it’s a clingstone.

    While Georgia may be the first state to come to mind when we think of peaches, California actually leads the nation in production. In the United States, 20 states produce peaches commercially. Besides California and Georgia, the other two top producers are South Carolina and New Jersey. Pennsylvania and Washington grow a lot of peaches, too.

    This sweet stone fruit makes delicious ice cream when it’s very ripe and full of peachy juices. However, you don’t have to use fresh peaches to make this ice cream. Buy frozen peaches if the grocery or farmer’s markets don’t have them in yet. The family will love making homemade ice cream together. The best part will be eating up the finished product on a hot summer day. 

    HOW TO OBSERVE NATIONAL PEACH ICE CREAM DAY

    Grab your ice cream maker and invite your friends and neighbors over for an old-fashioned ice cream social! Give this homemade peach ice cream recipe a try. If you need tips for picking fresh peaches visit Frog Hollow for an easy guide to the best peaches. 

    You can also visit an ice cream parlor and order a dish or cone. Don’t hesitate to add sprinkles or some pecans.

    Share your own on social media using #PeachIceCreamDay.

    NATIONAL PEACH ICE CREAM DAY HISTORY

    The origin of Peach Ice Cream Day is currently unknown.

     

    July 17th Celebrated History

    1902

    Engineer and inventor, Willis Carrier designs the first modern air conditioner.

    1938

    Pilot Douglas Corrigan departs from Brooklyn, New York in his Curtiss Robin aircraft. His destination was home to California, but he somehow ended up in Ireland.

    1955

    Disneyland opens in Anaheim, California.

    1962

    The House of Representatives convenes a special subcommittee of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics. Two of the Mercury Thirteen (women who passed two of the three testing phases created by Dr. William Lovelace) appeared before the committee to testify regarding gender discrimination. Jerrie Cobb and Janey Hart presented their cases to the committee in the hopes of being permitted to join the space program and continue into phase three with NASA. Jackie Cochran, who had sponsored the privately funded phase one and two testings, also testified. However, her testimony, along with others, suggested the women were not qualified for the Mercury program.

    July 17th Celebrated  Birthdays

    Phyliss Diller – 1917

    The American comedic legend was one of the first women to launch a stand-up career. She brought audiences to laughter and tears with her bold and witty one-liners in the 50s, 60s and 70s.

    Nils Bohlin – 1920

    In 1962, the Swedish engineer received a U.S. patent for his invention of the three-point seat belt.

    Toni Stone – 1921

    Toni Stone became the first woman to play professional baseball when she was signed to the Negro American League’s Indianapolis Clowns in 1953. For the Clowns, she played second base and maintained a respectable .243 batting average. In 1991, Stone was inducted into the Women’s Sports Hall of Fame.

    Diahann Carroll – 1935

    In 1962, the American actress and singer of stage and screen won a Tony Award for her role in the musical No Strings. Carroll became known for her roles in the films Carmen Jones and Porgy and Bess as well as several television shows including the drama Julia.