Category: February

  • INTERNATIONAL SNOWMOBILE RIDE DAY | Second Saturday in February

    International Snowmobile Ride Day | Second Saturday in February

    The second Saturday in February is International Snowmobile Ride Day as a day to encourage everyone to bundle up for an exciting adventure outside on a snowmobile.

    #SnowmobileRideDay

    International Snowmobile Ride Day is the perfect day for everyone to get outside and experience the outdoors during the winter months. In fact, we can’t think of a better way to see the beauty of winter than while riding a snowmobile. Besides providing an opportunity to view the winter wonderland around you, riding a snowmobile is also a great way for families to get together for fun during the long, winter months.

    What is a snowmobile? A snowmobile is a motorized vehicle designed to operate on snow or ice, using tracks or runners on the bottom to move the machine. Snowmobiles do not travel on the open road, but instead on open terrain or on trails. The design is specific for use during the winter months for travel and recreation. Depending on where you live, a snowmobile can go by several other names:

    • Ski-Doo
    • Snowmachine
    • Sled
    • Motor Sled
    • Skimmobile

    Winter Playground

    Winter is one of the most beautiful seasons. Many people miss out on that beauty because of the cold. However, snowmobiling is the perfect activity to experience that beauty. Riding snowmobile can take you over hundreds of miles of hard-to-reach landscapes. In fact, snowmobiling allows you to explore gorgeous scenery of snow covered hills, plains, and mountain trails. Imagine traveling on a trail and you stop to overlook a canyon as the sun goes down. The glow of the winter sun emitting off of pure white snow looks like miles and miles of sparkling gems glowing in different hues of red, orange, and yellow.

    Driving a snowmobile is easy to learn. Whether you are a part of a snowmobiling club or you ride as a hobby, anyone can ride a snowmobile. The entire family, from kids to grandparents, can learn to drive a snowmobile quickly by simply pushing buttons. Once you learn the basic parts of a snowmobile, you will be on the trail in no time making winter fun again and making memories that will last you a life time.

    CELEBRATE SNOWMOBILING

    • Join a snowmobile club.
    • Plan a day of trail riding with your family and friends.
    • Teach a snowmobile safety course.
    • Learn about the different varieties of snowmobiles on the market.
    • Document your trail ride and post to social media using #SnowmobileRideDay.

    INTERNATIONAL HISTORY 

    In 2022, BRP, Inc. joined the National Day Calendar Founder Family establishing International Snowmobile Ride Day. This family-fun winter day is to be celebrated each year on the second Saturday in February. As stand-alone company, BRP, Inc.  has brought an impressive portfolio of products that has been enabling unforgettable experiences for their customers for decades.

    About

    In 1937, Joseph-Armand Bombardier was granted a patent for the first ever vehicle that could travel on snow. Developed in his garage in Valcourt, Quebec, Bombardier worked through his personal determination and daring ideas. In 1942, a second, larger vehicle followed his patent. This led to Bombardier founding his own company that same year. The company became known as L’Auto-Neige Bombardier Limité.

    Over the years, J.-A. Bombardier refines his own design and launches the Ski-Doo in 1959, which was powered by a Kohler motor. This innovative product created a new sport that became known as snowmobiling. In the years to follow, Bombardier would seek to consistently innovate new machines by exploring every playground and revolutionizing the powersports industry. Today, the BRP, Inc. riders can be transported on snow, on water, on the ground, and even in the air. United by their passion to keep moving forward towards new adventures, BRP, Inc. gives their customers around the world the power to create their best memories.

    Important Dates

    • 1942 – Start up of Auto-neige Bombardier Ltd.
    • 1959 – Industry-first Ski-Doo snowmobile.
    • 1968 – Industry-first Sea-Doo PWC.
    • 1970 – Acquisition of the Austrian Rotax brand.
    • 1989 – Acquisition of the Nordtrac Oy and Lynx brand.
    • 1998 – Bombardier enters the ATV market.
    • 2001 – Acquisition of the Evinrude and Johnson brands.
    • 2003 – Bombardier sells its Recreational Products division; BRP is officially launched.
    • 2007 – Industry-first three-wheel vehicle .
    • 2010 – BRP enters the side-by-side vehicle market
    • 2013 – BRP’s Initial Public Offering.
    • 2018 – Acquisition of the Alumacraft and Manitou Brands.
    • 2018 – BRP enters the Nasdaq.
    • 2019 – Acquisition of Australian boat manufacturer Telwater.
    • 2020 – BRP refocuses its marine business; Discontinuation of Evinrude E-TEC and E-TEC G3 outboard engines.
  • NATIONAL LETTER TO AN ELDER DAY – February 26

    NATIONAL LETTER TO AN ELDER DAY

    Every year on February 26th, National Letter to an Elder Day encourages putting pen to paper and writing to an elder you know. The day serves to remind that loved ones enjoy hearing from us and that a simple letter brightens their day.

    Everyone knows that writing is a powerful way to stay connected. If you’ve ever received an unexpected letter, you know what a pick-me-up it can be. Letter to an Elder Day takes that unexpected gift one step further and delivers that love to the elders in our life or those who may be isolated from others.

    HOW TO OSBERVE #LettersToAnElderDay

    • Write a letter to an elder.
    • Host a letter-writing party to write as many letters as possible.
    • Create a classroom letter-writing project.
    • Visit Love for Our Elders to join their letter-writing campaign.
    • Send a handmade card.
    • Use #LettersToAnElder on social media to join the conversation.

    NATIONAL LETTERS TO AN ELDER DAY HISTORY

    Love for Our Elders founded National Letters to an Elder Day in 2020 to encourage handwritten letters to elders all across the country. The story begins with a young boy and his grandpa. When Jacob Cramer lost his grandfather, he began to volunteer at a local senior living community as a way of honoring his memory. The residents lovingly referred to him as “Bingo Boy” because of his entertaining and lively way of calling the community’s bingo game (a much-heated affair, he’s sure to tell you). While volunteering, Jacob discovered that many of the residents rarely received messages or visitors from family and friends and that loneliness was a chronic and ever-present problem.

    So Jacob decided to start writing letters of love to senior communities; quickly, his moniker changed from Bingo Boy to Letter Boy. He found grace and love in his relationships with his friends in the senior community and eventually decided to take his letter-writing efforts national. Jacob created a nonprofit that urged people to write letters to elders (or anyone else in need who are older than them) and facilitated the delivery to seniors worldwide. Since 2013, Jacob and his team have amassed an army of 50,000+ letter writers worldwide.

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, they branched out to collect video messages of hope, love, and encouragement, created public awareness campaigns, and engaged individuals, classrooms, and companies. National Letter to an Elder Day is held on February 26 to coincide with the birthday of Jacob’s grandmother, Doris.

    Letters FAQ

    Q. Can I just send a card?
    A. You can send a card, but Love for Our Elders asks that you write a letter, too. Make an effort to write several sentences.

    Q. Can I write a poem?
    A. Yes! Be as creative as you want to be. However, Love for Our Elders asks that you don’t use glitter. We completely agree!

    Q. Can I send the letter to someone I know?
    A. Yes! If you don’t know who to send the letter to, the Love for Our Elders website will connect you to someone to write your letter to.

    Q. Is February 26th the only day I should send a letter to an elder?
    A. No. This year-round effort encourages you to write and keep writing to our elders.

  • CLASSROOM – Mother Language

    CLASSROOM – Mother Language

    A mother language is the first language a person begins to speak. Imagine if you were the last person who knew how to speak your mother language. How important would it be to save your language? This week in the classroom we discuss mother languages and learning new languages. Languages are a part of our culture. The words, the sentence structure, even how we say certain words are influenced by our culture and history. When a language is lost, much of a culture dies with it.

    This week, look into languages with dwindling speakers. Discover what is being done to preserve those languages.

    HOW TO OBSERVE in the CLASSROOM – Mother Language

    Download and print this week’s projects. You can also follow the suggestions below to help your students explore the days in their own way. It might surprise you what they discover! We’re often surprised by our own discoveries!

    Celebrate Every Day in the Classroom by:

    1. Asking a question about the day or observance and finding the answer.
    2. Exploring the subject further. Whether you read a book, interview an expert, watch a documentary, or run an experiment, there is always more to learn about the observance.
    3. Writing about the day or observance. You can write about what you learned or what the day means to you.
    4. Telling someone about the day. You might be sharing information that is helpful to someone. Or, you might brighten someone’s day.
    5. Solving a problem. Many observances discuss issues around the world that need fixing. How would you fix it?
    6. Being creative. Draw, paint, build, design, bake, create your idea of what the observance means.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

  • CLASSROOM – No One Eats Alone

    CLASSROOM – No One Eats Alone

    Classrooms across the country participate in No One Eats Alone Day. The student-led observance is a call to action and encourages students to include their fellow peers at lunchtime. This week in the classroom we offer up a project that will encourage students to get to know someone new. It serves as an invitation to build friendships and an environment of understanding.

    HOW TO OBSERVE in the CLASSROOM – No One Eats Alone

    Download and print this week’s projects. You can also follow the suggestions below to help your students explore the days in their own way. It might surprise you what they discover! We’re often surprised by our own discoveries!

    Celebrate Every Day in the Classroom by:

    1. Asking a question about the day or observance and finding the answer.
    2. Exploring the subject further. Whether you read a book, interview an expert, watch a documentary, or run an experiment, there is always more to learn about the observance.
    3. Writing about the day or observance. You can write about what you learned or what the day means to you.
    4. Telling someone about the day. You might be sharing information that is helpful to someone. Or, you might brighten someone’s day.
    5. Solving a problem. Many observances discuss issues around the world that need fixing. How would you fix it?
    6. Being creative. Draw, paint, build, design, bake, create your idea of what the observance means.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    Download and print this week’s projects to celebrate No One Eats Alone Day.

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

  • NIRVANA DAY – February 8 or February 15

    NIRVANA DAY 

    Every year on either February 8th or 15th, Mahayana Buddhists throughout the world celebrate Nirvana Day. The event, also known as Parinirvana Day, commemorates Buddha’s death and his entrance into complete Nirvana.

    Some people mistakenly think that the historical Buddha was a god. However, he was an ordinary person named Siddhartha Gautama. Buddha was actually his title. The word “buddha” means “a person who is awake.”

    The Buddha is believed to have been born in 567 BC in Nepal. As the son of a king, he was called Prince Siddhartha. He was 29 years old when he encountered his first sick person, old man, and then a corpse. He realized that even though he was royalty, he too, would one day die. To prepare for this day, he went on a spiritual quest. During this time, he renounced his worldly life. Eventually, he discovered that meditation was the only path to a peaceful existence.

    One day, he sat in meditation beneath a ficus tree until he realized enlightenment. From that time on, he became known as The Buddha. He spent the rest of his life teaching others how to realize enlightenment for themselves. This enlightenment focuses on four noble truths:

    • Life involves suffering.
    • Having desires causes suffering.
    • Overcoming desires can end suffering.
    • Following the Eightfold Path, which is represented by a wheel, can also end suffering.

    When enlightenment is realized, it is called partial nirvana. Complete or final nirvana is achieved only in death. This is when all want and suffering is gone. The Buddha died at the age of 80. After his death, his disciples established schools in his name.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #NirvanaDay

    • Contemplate the teachings of Buddha.
    • Buddhist monasteries and temples to hold meditation retreats.
    • Some people remember their family members or friends who have died. Doing so helps them reflect on the fact that death is part of life for everyone.
    • Learn more about The Buddha and his teachings.
    • Read about how Buddhism influenced these famous people: Tiger Woods, Steve Jobs, George Lucas, and Tina Turner.
    • Read a book on Buddhism, such as, What the Buddha Taught, Buddhism for Beginners, or The Art of Happiness.

    Share this day on social media with #NirvanaDay.

    NIRVANA DAY HISTORY

    This day has been observed for thousands of years, primarily by Mahayana Buddhists. These Buddhists reside in China, Japan, Korea, Tibet, Vietnam, and other parts of the world. Since the date is not exactly known when The Buddha died, some Buddhists observe this day on February 8th. The majority of Buddhists observe it on February 15th.

  • FOUR CHAPLAINS DAY – February 3

    FOUR CHAPLAINS DAY

    On February 3rd each year, Four Chaplains Day honors four military chaplains from World War II who sacrificed their lives for fellow service members.

    #FourChaplainsDay

    Chaplains in the military are an integral part of the service environment. They provide counseling, spiritual guidance, conduct services, and religious rites, among other responsibilities, and serve all over the globe. If there are military personnel stationed there, chaplains are too.

    During World War II, four chaplains who had attended Chaplain School together at Harvard boarded the Dorchester en route to the Army Command Base in southern Greenland. Aboard the ship were 904 service members.

    The four chaplains were Reverend George L. Fox, a Methodist minister, Reverend Clark V. Poling of the Reformed Church of America, Rabbi Alexander D. Goode, and Father John P. Washington of the Roman Catholic Church. Their voyage began on January 23, 1943. At the time, German U-Boats were patrolling the area, and the convoy was on high alert. When a German submarine torpedoed the Dorchester on February 3, 1943, in the frigid waters off the coast of Newfoundland, chaos ensued.

    Eyewitnesses recounted the chaplains’ heroism, including giving their life jackets and gloves to other service members. They prayed with service members, assisting them into lifeboats. The four chaplains remained on the sinking Dorchester. Only 230 men were rescued from the waters.

    Congress awarded the four chaplains the Four Chaplains Medal in 1960.

    HOW TO OBSERVE FOUR CHAPLAINS DAY

    • Read about the four chaplains in books like No Greater Glory: The Four Immortal Chaplains and the Sinking of the Dorchester in World War II by Dan Kurzman or Sea of Glory by Ken Wales.
    • Watch the movie Four Chaplains: Sacrifice at Sea.
    • Visit exhibits remembering the four chaplains such as the National World War II Museum in New Orleans or Pioneer Chapel at Fort Leavenworth where a stained glass window remembers the chaplains.
    • Attend memorial services in honor of the four chaplains.

    FOUR CHAPLAINS DAY HISTORY

    In 1998, Congress unanimously established Four Chaplains Day to be observed annually on February 3rd.

  • NATIONAL LEADERSHIP DAY – February 20

    NATIONAL LEADERSHIP DAY

    National Leadership Day is set aside to acknowledge the power of leadership. Every year, on February 20th, we recognize the impact that leaders make in people’s lives as they seek to develop themselves and others.

    When you think about it, in every relationship, one person influences another, whether a parent or child, spouse or friend, student or teacher, employer or employee. In our everyday interactions with one another, someone is leading or influencing the other to do something or become something. This means that anyone can be a leader, whether you have a title or not.

    Over 50 years ago, John C. Maxwell defined leadership as this: “Leadership is influence; nothing more, nothing less.”

    When we talk about leadership, we know that leadership is about growth – for yourself, your relationships, your productivity, and your people. To lead well, you must embrace your need for continual improvement so that you can be the best leader you can be.

    maxwell_leadership_coaching_nld

    The observance aims to empower people to help others and be change agents and difference makers in someone’s life. This is the opportunity we have on National Leadership Day: To show people what it means to be a good leader and inspire them to be a positive force of change in another person’s life.

    HOW TO OBSERVE – #NationalLeadershipDay

    “Leadership is not about titles, positions, or flow charts. It is about one life influencing another.” John C. Maxwell

    National Leadership Day is your opportunity to celebrate the value and contributions of positive leadership around you. Share your leadership stories and recognize the leaders in your life.

    • Recognize a leader within your company, community, or home by telling them you value them as a leader. Share a story about them on social media and tag your post with #NationalLeadershipDay.
    • Share your favorite leadership quote or book on social media. Tag your post with #NationalLeadershipDay.
    • Commit to reading (or re-reading) at least one leadership development book or take a course to sharpen your leadership skills this year.
    • Connect with those you lead and share a leadership lesson or value and allow them to share their takeaways.
    • Visit the John Maxwell website (www.johnmaxwell.com) for leadership development books, podcasts, speakers, and more!

    Remember to use #NationalLeadershipDay on social media so we can connect with and share your stories.

    RECOGNIZING THE POWER OF LEADERSHIP

    “In a time when the world is desperate for good leadership, we are incredibly excited to be the catalysts behind National Leadership Day – the day that will inspire people to become more effective leaders. From now on, we will see February 20, which is also our Founder’s, John C. Maxwell’s birthday, as an opportunity for the Maxwell Leadership Enterprise to ignite, engage and equip people to lead well. Our mission is simple: To add value to people who multiply value to others; and our time is now!”

    Mark Cole, CEO Maxwell Leadership Enterprise

    NATIONAL LEADERSHIP DAY HISTORY

    The Maxwell Leadership Enterprise founded National Leadership Day in 2021 to recognize what it means to be a good leader. Everyone can lead, regardless of their title or position. Once you realize the impact of your influence, you will see that you can make a difference right where you are. That is the power of leadership!

    The inaugural National Leadership Day in 2022 also commemorates John C. Maxwell’s 75th birthday on February 20th. Considered the foremost authority on leadership, when others were writing about management, Maxwell began to define leadership, pointing out the difference between managing (position/process-focused) and leading (people-focused). Over 90 books, millions of trained leaders, and tens of millions of readers, subscribers, and followers later, Maxwell has received many awards for leadership from Forbes, Inc 500, and many other organizations. He also received a Horatio Alger award for his contribution to service.

    The Registrar at National Day Calendar proclaimed National Leadership Day in 2022 to be observed annually.

    About The Maxwell Leadership Enterprise

    Carrying out the transformational leadership legacy of John C. Maxwell, the Maxwell Leadership enterprise’s mission is to add value to people so they can multiply value to others. Through leadership development programs and resources, our goal is to help people to increase their impact and influence by equipping them to become better leaders.

     

  • CLASSROOM – Friends

    CLASSROOM – Friends

    National Make a Friend Day inspires this week’s Classroom. Friends are a vital part of our lives. In the classroom, our friends are often the people we see every day. Making new friends is sometimes difficult. We may be shy or don’t know what to say. This week in the classroom, we’ve created a couple of projects to help break the ice and make making friends just a little bit easier.

    HOW TO OBSERVE in the CLASSROOM – Friends

    Download and print this week’s projects about friendship and make some new friends. You can also follow the suggestions below to help your students explore the days in their own way. It might surprise you what they discover! We’re often surprised by our own discoveries!

    Celebrate Every Day in the Classroom by:

    1. Asking a question about the day or observance and finding the answer.
    2. Exploring the subject further. Whether you read a book, interview an expert, watch a documentary, or run an experiment, there is always more to learn about the observance.
    3. Writing about the day or observance. You can write about what you learned or what the day means to you.
    4. Telling someone about the day. You might be sharing information that is helpful to someone. Or, you might brighten someone’s day.
    5. Solving a problem. Many observances discuss issues around the world that need fixing. How would you fix it?
    6. Being creative. Draw, paint, build, design, bake, create your idea of what the observance means.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    Download and print this week’s projects including a printable Friendship Fortune.

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!

  • NATIONAL SET A GOOD EXAMPLE DAY – February 26

    NATIONAL SET A GOOD EXAMPLE DAY

    When we observe kindness in others, we are often inspired to offer kindness ourselves. Someone set a good example for us to follow, and we must continue those good examples for others in our lives. National Set A Good Example Day on February 26th encourages us to set a good example that inspires others.

    Everyone influences others. The influence could be positive or negative. Even from a young age, we experience good and bad behavior. Parents can positively influence their children at an early age. Additionally, many others, such as our extended families, educators, mentors, community leaders, and even organizations, can positively influence us in many ways. Some of the ways we can easily set a good example include:

    • Demonstrating kindness.
    • Being compassionate.
    • Acting with fairness.
    • Practicing tolerance.
    • Being just.
    • Treating others with respect.

    These good examples reflect a person’s values and positively affect them and others. Setting a good example can be applied in every setting, including home, school, work, and in the community at large.

    Set A Good Example Day encourages individuals of any age and from any background to contribute to the well being of others. A simple act of kindness, consideration, or good conduct enhances the person and the whole community.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #SetAGoodExampleDay

    National Set a Good Example Day encourages everyone to demonstrate thoughtfulness, courtesy, graciousness, and common sense values and virtues in their daily lives.

    Get caught helping another person. Wear an attitude of respect for other human beings. Develop the tools in yourself to be efficient, productive, and responsible, and let others see you using these tools. You can also:

    • Celebrate others who set good examples. Let them know how their leadership impacts your life.
    • Be a good example. Demonstrate positive virtues every day so others can benefit. They will be more likely to set a good example themselves.
    • Recognize good examples at work, home, school, and in your community.
    • Share the good examples you find valuable in your life.

    Follow the conversation and learn more by using #SetAGoodExampleDay on social media.

    NATIONAL SET A GOOD EXAMPLE DAY HISTORY

    The Way to Happiness Foundation InternationalThe Way to Happiness ® Foundation International founded National Set a Good Example Day on February 26, 2022, to celebrate those who are setting good examples for others and to encourage more people to do the same.

    The Registrar at National Day Calendar proclaimed National Set a Good Example Day to be observed annually on February 26th.

  • CLASSROOM – Vacuum

    CLASSROOM – Vacuum

    National Create A Vacuum Day inspires this week’s classroom projects. There are a variety of ways to experiment with vacuums. These experiments help us to study atmospheric pressure and how it affects the world around us.

    HOW TO OBSERVE in the CLASSROOM – Vacuum

    Download and print this week’s science projects about creating vacuums. You can also follow the suggestions below to help your students explore the days in their own way. It might surprise you what they discover! We’re often surprised by our own discoveries!

    Celebrate Every Day in the Classroom by:

    1. Asking a question about the day or observance and finding the answer.
    2. Exploring the subject further. Whether you read a book, interview an expert, watch a documentary, or run an experiment, there is always more to learn about the observance.
    3. Writing about the day or observance. You can write about what you learned or what the day means to you.
    4. Telling someone about the day. You might be sharing information that is helpful to someone. Or, you might brighten someone’s day.
    5. Solving a problem. Many observances discuss issues around the world that need fixing. How would you fix it?
    6. Being creative. Draw, paint, build, design, bake, create your idea of what the observance means.

    Of course, as always, sharing on social media isn’t required; learning is. But if you do, please use #NDCClassroom to share on social media.

    THIS WEEK’S PROJECTS

    Check out these experiments to learn more about vacuums. We also offer week 44 of the Celebration Challenge.

    There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day® with National Day Calendar®!