• GIA REYNOLDS

    MEET GIA REYNOLDS

    This Grand Rapids, Michigan girl loves entertaining and all things party-related and fun! But don’t let that fool you. Gia Reynolds also has been working in the banking industry for over 20 years and absolutely loves it.

    Though, her real passion is creating and hosting fabulous dinner parties decked out with delicious and elegant meals and desserts. Gia looks forward to brainstorming party ideas for special events, and that’s why she is the owner and smiling face behind The Houseshoe Hostess Blog.

    “I live by the principle that people may not remember what you said, but they will always remember how you made them feel…or what you cooked!”
    ~ Gia Reynolds

    Finding the Celebrate Every Day

    Before a back injury, Gia used to cater to large groups of people. While she was recovering, she laid in bed, worried she would lose her passion. However, every day ideas for recipes kept coming to her. She knew what she was going to cook when she recovered and made a promise to Celebrate Every Day! Before she knew it, Gia had several party ideas and recipes formulated. The Houseshoe Hostess was born.
    “I love making everyone I come in contact with feel happy and loved.” ~Gia Reynolds
    Gia says she has been an unofficial National Day Calendar Ambassador for years. She faithfully posted about national days all the time. So much so, people have started asking her questions about them. That’s definitely an ambassador quality!
    Gia also points out that when her kids were younger, she worked a lot, and she often felt guilty about it. She promised herself it would be different with her grandchildren. She brings them fun every chance she gets.

    Fun Friday

    Another element she added to her workweek at the bank is known as “Fun Friday.” People are often eager for the weekend or feel the week is dragging. Gia created different party themes every week for the summer to get customers excited, and it worked like a charm. Customers who saw each other every week but never talked suddenly connected and struck up conversations. They laughed and chatted while waiting in line! A positive and welcome change came into the bank lobby.

    Most of the time, all it takes is one happy person to change the room’s energy, and Gia brings that energy.

    That’s exactly what drew Gia to the National Day Calendar. Even though Gia is one of those happy people who change the energy in a room, Gia says, “National Day Calendar is a happy person who changes the energy.”

    Follow Gia on her social media handles.

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  • CELEBRATION SPOTLIGHT – Gia Reynolds

    CELEBRATION SPOTLIGHT – Gia Reynolds

    Interviewing Gia Reynolds for the Celebration Spotlight is like interviewing a good friend or a beloved family member. Maybe that’s why her friends call her Mama Gia; we can always turn to her and count on a good meal in the process. Gia is the founder of The Houseshoe Hostess. She and I visited in February about food, family, friendship, and how she loves to keep things positive.

    Learning to be a Hostess

    Michele: Can you tell everybody the story of The Houseshoe Hostess?

    Gia: I’d be more than happy to. I was raised to be a hostess. My grandmother was the best hostess, and she raised me. I helped her set up Yahtzee parties and Tupperware parties. I was young when I was helping her set those up, so I think that’s where I got the hostess bug. So, she would cook and invite everyone over on Friday and Saturdays and have a big girlfriends’ party every weekend.

    Michele: What kind of things did your grandmother cook?

    Gia: Comfort food. And that’s where my love for comfort food came from. Back then, it wasn’t as healthy, so I try to create comfort food so you can still indulge but a little bit on the healthier side.

    Michele: You take away a little bit of the guilt.

    Gia: Yes. But then you feel guilty because you want to eat more.

    Soirees and House Shoes

    Michele: So your story about the Houseshoe Hostess – how did that come about, and what is that story?

    Gia: I have been in banking for 23 years, and I had a back injury. I headed to work one day, and I slipped and fell. I had disc issues. At that time, I was catering and doing banking. And when I fell and during my recovery, all I could think about…I wasn’t thinking about banking…all I could think about was, “I’m not going to be able to throw parties anymore. I’m not going to be able to stand and cook. It’s nothing like having a roast in the oven and perfuming the whole home.

    And that’s all I kept thinking about. It was a three or four-month recovery period. I just wrote recipes and planned parties and all of that. A few years before that I started to do a blog. But I was working too many hours, and it never really took off. It was called Soirees and Slippers. Well, no one could pronounce “soiree,” and so it just didn’t stick.

    Michele: I could pronounce it, but I’m not sure I could spell it.

    “I just wrote recipes and planned parties and all of that.” ~Gia Reynolds

    Gia: Yeah. So it didn’t stick with me. I always keep my house a little chillier than most, so when friends would come over they would say my house is cold. So I would always have house shoes and blankets and snuggies for friends that visited often. So that’s where the name Houseshoe Hostess came from. At first, they would come over and be dressed up for a party and I’m like, “This isn’t me. When you come over, wear some yoga pants or sweats.

    Michele: Come as you are.

    Gia: Yes. And we eat good food and watch TV and just talk and socialize. My friends say, “You’re the best hostess,” and the house shoe just came along with it.

    Michele: It fits together, and there’s a story behind it. It makes people ask you, “Where did you get this idea?”

    Gia: A lot of people are drawn to the name. And I’ve gotten a lot of followers just by people asking, “Where did this name come from?”

    Michele: It makes people curious. I know it did me. I love hearing you tell the story both on your social media channels and in person, too.

    Connections

    Gia: I love it. It’s one of those things…you know how you start out, and you want something to connect you to other people? I think everybody can connect to good food and relaxing. Especially nowadays. Stress-free.

    Michele: I’ve talked to a few people about how it’s their love language to cook good food for people and I think you fit that description quite well. What are some of your favorite things to make?

    Gia: I love a good roast. Roast chicken, beef roast, pork roast, anything like that. Like I mentioned before, something you just put together, and when people come in, they’re like, “What is that you’re cooking?” Recently someone delivered something to me and he stuck his whole head in my apartment and said, “What is that you’re making?” You want people to start eating with their eyes and their nose first. I love that. You can’t get past a good steak and potato and stuff like that, too.

    “You want people to start eating with their eyes and their nose first. I love that.” ~ Gia Reynolds

    Michele: On Instagram, you make beautiful arrangements of your food and just an amazing colorful setting. So, yes, I’m sure people are eating with their eyes when they’re sitting down as well as their nose because you’ve made it beautiful.

    Gia: Thank you. And you know, for a long time…I have a lot of friends who are bakers, and I’ve always said, “Bakers just create the most beautiful things.” I just put salt and pepper on stuff. It’s not like making a creation. Just recently, I’ve kind of accepted that people…you know how you get a compliment and like, “Do I deserve that?” So now, with a lot of people complimenting me like you did, I think, “Maybe it is more than salt and pepper.”

    Michele: And a little bit of love. You know, I know how you feel when you think you didn’t do much or you don’t think you did. Just say, “Thank you.” That’s what my momma always said. If you get a compliment, just say thank you. And then you know you’ve acknowledged their compliment.

    I know, too, that you’re trying new things. What advice would you give someone who wants to try new things?

    Life Happens

    Gia: Actually. Life. Life happened. The pandemic happened. I have just seen so many changes and not all great changes. And I just thought, what better time to do it than now. I kind of hesitated a little because you think, “What if this doesn’t go right,” and “What if this…” But now I’m to the point where everyone started out new at some point. And everyone always tells me that I give the best advice, but I don’t take my own advice.

    Michele: I do that.

    Gia: And so this year, I decided I’m going to treat myself like I would treat a friend. I would encourage a friend and no limits! You need to do that for yourself, and that’s what started me getting out of my comfort zone.

    Michele: You’ve been baking, too, right?

    “And so this year, I decided I’m going to treat myself like I would treat a friend.” Gia Reynolds

    Gia: I have.

    Michele: Is that not your normal thing to do?

    Gia: I bake easy stuff. I should say, easy to me. My grandmother liked pound cakes, zucchini bread, banana bread, and stuff like that. But I’m challenging myself to start baking more.

    Make Mistakes

    Michele: I’ve seen some posts on your social media where it seems like you’re not afraid to put your mistakes out there; let everyone see where you messed up and try again. And that’s one thing that I really take from your posts as inspiring and shows you’re not afraid. “Yep, this is where I went wrong. But here’s my success.”

    Gia: I actually have a whole highlight reel on my Instagram. I don’t want people to look at this and think, “Ooh, she’s perfect.” Because it’s not that way at all, but I also don’t want someone new into cooking or baking to get discouraged if things don’t turn out right. So, I do show all of them.

    Michele: She does, people. She really does. Your mouth will water, even the bad stuff she posts where she made a mistake.

    Gia: When we were catering, one of my all-time favorite mistakes was…I remember one summer we had a person who wanted like 50 or 60 crème brûlées. And I’m like, “That’s a lot!” So, I tried to make crème brûlée bars. It’s easier to turn everything into a bar when you have to make large quantities. So, it didn’t turn out right. I went back and had to try something else, and my family had devoured it. And they wanted to know, “What is this?” We didn’t even have a name for it because it was a mistake.

    “It’s easier to turn everything into a bar when you had to make large quantities.” ~ Gia Reynolds

    That’s one recipe I kind of keep to myself. You won’t see that on my blog or Instagram or anything like that. However, if I talk to you and you and I are having a good day, I will definitely bring you some of those. I share them with love. I just don’t share that recipe online.

    Michele: Gia’s little secret treat.

    Gia: At first, I made them so much because everyone loved them that I was just, “Ok. I’m done.” I boycotted them for years. I was literally making them no stop. I always forget how delicious they are because I made them so often.

    Celebration Ambassador

    Michele: You’re a Celebration Nation Ambassador for National Day Calendar, and you’ve been at this for a year.

    Gia: I have been even before I met you guys.

    Michele: Right. A lot of ambassadors are before they become ambassadors. How did you find us? What do you enjoy about being an ambassador?

    Gia: I love it! I think that it’s what everyone needs. It’s a selfless act, and it makes you feel good, and it makes other people feel good. Even if I’m not having a great day, I can look through the calendar of what’s coming up and instantly feel better.

    Michele: That’s that ripple effect right there.

    Gia: Exactly. I don’t know how I stumbled across your calendar, but I’ve been looking at it for quite some time. I always look on the calendar, and at work, people are always asking me, “What’s coming up?” And I give the calendars out as gifts. I call it the feel-good ambassador because you can’t be unhappy by looking at the days. And some of the days are not as fun as other ones. There are some serious days out there.

    Michele: Awareness days and things like that that make you think.

    Gia: You appreciate those even more.

    Michele: Everyone can learn something from one of the days. There’s always something there to learn.

    Awareness & Heroes

    Gia: I had a girlfriend whose mom passed away several years ago from scleroderma. And at that time, we had no idea what it was. Even the doctors didn’t know. We’re talking 18 years ago or so. It’s on the calendar, and I told her about that. We had a moment. It’s good that it’s bringing awareness because, for months, the doctors didn’t know what it was.

    Michele: There’s a lot of those rare conditions to bring awareness. What are some of your favorite holidays?

    Gia: I am all about girlfriends. National Girlfriends Day is one of my favorites. Galentine’s Day is another. Ninety percent of the food holidays. All the superhero days.

    Michele: Those are fun, too. Do your grandchildren like those days, too?

    Gia: Yes. We’ve always celebrated those days. When new superhero movies come out and things like that. I was never into superhero movies until I had boys, and now when a new superhero movie comes out, I want to know if we’re going to see it.

    And we’ll go out as a family to see if we can. Luckily we’re in the same area. My son was in the military, but now he’s back home.

    Michele: My son was in the military, too, and he’s back home now, too. So I know the feeling about having him back.

    Gia: Thank him for his service.

    Michele: You do the same for your son.

    Gia: My son, when he was in the 8th grade, four or five of his friends, they all decided – they were in ROTC – and they all decided they were going into the military. All of them went except one because he got a football scholarship.

    Celebrate Every Day

    Michele: What does Celebrate Every Day mean to do?

    Gia: That no matter what you’re going through, you can find something to be happy about and celebrate. That was just recently brought to my attention. I was thinking about something in a negative way, and I was surprised because I will cut a negative thought off in a second. I recently just lost my mom.

    I made mistake and played a voicemail she had left on my phone. I was very sad, and it took me back. So, I was telling a friend about it, and he said, “You know, I wish I had a message from my grandmother, that way, I could hear her voice because I don’t have anything.” And I realized I should be happy about that. So, you celebrate even when you don’t want to celebrate. Just by him mentioning that, it turned my whole thoughts around, and Celebrate Every Day is like that. A lot of people now are struggling to even put a smile on their face. Covid has touched everyone. And so, I think if you can think about a celebration, it might not replace it, but lighten it a little bit and put a smile on your face.

    Michele: That’s a wonderful perspective. What are you celebrating this week?

    Black History Month

    Gia: For Black History Month…I was able to find a copy of Rosa Parks‘ Peanut Butter Pancakes. It was handwritten on an envelope. I became emotional making them. I just remember my grandma; when a recipe came to her, she wrote it down on whatever. So, the HuffPost posted it a few years ago. And I made it for Black History Month. Her birthday was February 4th. It was pretty important to me. I like my own recipes but honoring other people because I know how hard it is to formulate a recipe.

    Michele: What a fun and unique way to honor her and also to connect with her through food.

    Gia: So I asked other foodies to join in the collaboration, and we all made food that was special for Black History Month. It was very nice. And when you’re talking about good food…there was very good food there.

    “I just remember my grandma, when a recipe came to her, she wrote it down on whatever.” ~ Gia Reynolds

    Michele: What else was made?

    Gia: A lot of smothered food. Smother chicken, smothered pork chops. Someone made some cheddar biscuits with a sausage gravy. It was just really good food. Sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes soufflés and sweet potato buttered biscuits. Pot roast. It was a little bit of everything. It was just nice that we could all come together and honor her on her birthday and Black History Month.

    Michele: Have you done collaborations like this before?

    Gia: All last year, it was one collab one after another.

    You know, I’ve met so many people who’ve touched my heart that I’ve never met in person. I’ve made lifelong friends that I have never even given a hug to. I’ve also met foodie friends where we’ve connected, whether it be through National Day Calendar or through food or just anything, and we’ve traveled to meet each other. I went to Chicago this summer and met up with a foodie friend. And another foodie friend from Maryland who flew out for my birthday. So It’s good to just step outside the box and meet people you’ve never known through a platform like this.

    “I’ve made lifelong friends that I have never even given a hug to.” ~ Gia Reynolds

    Michele: It’s a common theme. You’re meeting people you wouldn’t normally meet and talking about subjects you might not normally talk about. Or things you both have an interest in. It’s a way to expand your horizons. What’s wrong with that?

    Gia: That’s one thing we all have in common is food. We’re all connected that way.

    Michele: When we gather, there’s always some food element to it.

    Gia: No matter what the nationality is.

    Michele: That’s right. Where ever you go, somebody is going to be putting food on the table when people come together. Even when we’re mourning someone we’ve lost. We bring food to the table; we feed our souls. It’s no surprise to me that there are more food days on the calendar than any other holidays.

    I always enjoy our conversations, Gia. You always brighten my day when we talk and make me feel my day was worth it.

    Gia: It’s not often that we have a connection with somebody right off, and I felt that with you.

  • GIA REYNOLDS

    MEET GIA REYNOLDS

    This Grand Rapids, Michigan girl loves entertaining and all things party-related and fun! But don’t let that fool you. Gia Reynolds also has been working in the banking industry for over 20 years and absolutely loves it.

    Though, her real passion is creating and hosting fabulous dinner parties decked out with delicious and elegant meals and desserts. Gia looks forward to brainstorming party ideas for special events, and that’s why she is the owner and smiling face behind The Houseshoe Hostess Blog.

    “I live by the principle that people may not remember what you said, but they will always remember how you made them feel…or what you cooked!”
    ~ Gia Reynolds

    Finding the Celebrate Every Day

    Before a back injury, Gia used to cater to large groups of people. While she was recovering, she laid in bed, worried she would lose her passion. However, every day ideas for recipes kept coming to her. She knew what she was going to cook when she recovered and made a promise to Celebrate Every Day! Before she knew it, Gia had several party ideas and recipes formulated. The Houseshoe Hostess was born.
    “I love making everyone I come in contact with feel happy and loved.” ~Gia Reynolds
    Gia says she has been an unofficial National Day Calendar Ambassador for years. She faithfully posted about national days all the time. So much so, people have started asking her questions about them. That’s definitely an ambassador quality!
    Gia also points out that when her kids were younger, she worked a lot, and she often felt guilty about it. She promised herself it would be different with her grandchildren. She brings them fun every chance she gets.

    Fun Friday

    Another element she added to her workweek at the bank is known as “Fun Friday.” People are often eager for the weekend or feel the week is dragging. Gia created different party themes every week for the summer to get customers excited, and it worked like a charm. Customers who saw each other every week but never talked suddenly connected and struck up conversations. They laughed and chatted while waiting in line! A positive and welcome change came into the bank lobby.

    Most of the time, all it takes is one happy person to change the room’s energy, and Gia brings that energy.

    That’s exactly what drew Gia to the National Day Calendar. Even though Gia is one of those happy people who change the energy in a room, Gia says, “National Day Calendar is a happy person who changes the energy.”

    Follow Gia on her social media handles.

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  • CELEBRATION AMBASSADORS

    The National Day Calendar® Celebration Ambassadors

  • NATIONAL CROWN ROAST OF PORK DAY – March 7

    NATIONAL CROWN ROAST OF PORK DAY

    March 7th recognizes a delicious and elegant, savory dish on National Crown Roast of Pork Day. The menu calls for a beautifully set table ready to receive a feast worthy of royalty or a celebration.

    Crown roast of pork earns its name when a pork loin forms a circle with the ribs pointing upwards, creating the points of a crown. Often they are held together with twine.  It is then seasoned, and usually stuffed, roasted and served, making a beautiful centerpiece on the table. The ends of the bones may be given a paper frill treatment for added decoration.

    For anyone familiar with roasting pork and other meats, this roast cooks much the same way. What makes it stand out from others is its presentation. It elevates an already flavorful cut of meat to a whole other level and makes the cook look exceptional in the process. 

    HOW TO OBSERVE #CrownRoastOfPorkDay

    • Invite friends and family over for an elegant feast.
    • Take a cooking class to learn how to make a crown roast of pork.
    • Visit your butcher for the perfect cut of meat.
    • Read the Celebration Spotlight with Gia Reynolds for more foodie conversation.
    • Use #CrownRoastOfPorkDay to post on social media.

    NATIONAL CROWN ROAST OF PORK DAY HISTORY

    While the crown roast is delicious, we’ve not been able to identify the creator of this most savory holiday celebration.

    Crown Roast FAQ

    Q. Is pork the only meat that is made into a crown roast?
    A. No. You can make a crown roast with beef and lamb, too.

    Q. What cut of meat is a crown roast?
    A. The crown roast is made from the loin of the animal.

  • NATIONAL S’MORES DAY – August 10

    NATIONAL S’MORES DAY | AUGUST 10

    National S’mores Day on August 10th recognizes the most popular campfire treat! Millions of people of all ages love this gooey, toasted treat. 

    #NationalSmoresDay

    S’mores consists of a roasted marshmallow with a layer of chocolate bar sandwiched between two pieces of graham cracker.

    The origin of this tasty snack is credited to the entrepreneur Alec Barnum. However, the first recorded version of the recipe can be found in the 1927 publication of Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts.  Even though the Girl Scouts were not the first ones to make s’mores, Girl Scout groups describe them in their reports as early as 1925. Earlier recipes used the name “Some Mores.”  It is unclear when the word “S’mores” became the more common name.

    Today, many variations on the original s’more find their way around a campfire.

    • Try spreading peanut butter on the graham crackers before adding the other ingredients.
    • Substitute peanut butter cups in place of the chocolate bar.
    • Replace the graham crackers with fudge-dipped cookies.
    • Add banana slices. 

    HOW TO OBSERVE NATIONAL S’MORES DAY

    Try this S’more Bar recipe at home. Enjoy and share with your friends and family. However, if you think s’mores are too messy for you but enjoy the flavor, add the s’more ingredients to delicious desserts. Cakes, pies, dips, trifles also offer a terrific way to enjoy the taste of a s’more.

    How many different ways can you make a s’more? Use #NationalSmoresDay to post on social media. 

    NATIONAL S’MORES DAY HISTORY

    National S’mores Day origins are currently unknown. 

     

    1787 

    Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart completes the chamber piece “Eine kleine Nachtmusik” (A Little Serenade). As one of his most popular works, the composition wasn’t published until after his death.

    1793 

    The Paris museum now known as the Grand Louvre opened in the former royal palace.

    1821 

    The state known as the gateway to the West joins the Union as the 24th state.

    1921 

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt is stricken with a paralytic illness at the family’s summer home on the Canadian island of Campobello. While doctors diagnosed the President with poliomyelitis, doctors today believe the cause of Roosevelt’s condition may have been a rare condition called Guillain–Barré syndrome.

    1941 

    President Coolidge dedicates Mount Rushmore in the South Dakota Black Hills.

    1948 

    The debut of Candid Camera brought humorous practical jokes played on unsuspecting everyday people to our living rooms.

    1950 

    Sunset Boulevard premiers at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. The American film noir was directed by Billy Wilder and starred William Holden and Gloria Swanson.

    1966

    The U.S. Treasury discontinues circulation of the $2. The design included the image of President Thomas Jefferson on one side and his Monticello estate on the other. In 1976, they reintroduced the bill as a Federal Reserve Note.

    1966 

    During the Perseid meteor shower, one fireball streaked across the sky during daylight hours. Visible from Utah to Canada, the fiery ball caused numerous calls to the FAA. It is the only known case of a meteor entering the Earth’s atmosphere and then leaving it again.

    1985 Michael Jackson buys ATV Music (every Beatle song) for $47 million

    Michael Jackson completes the deal to purchase ATV Music, including the catalog of Beatles songs, for $47 million.

    1990 

    Magellan enters orbit around Venus and begins mapping its surface.

    1993 

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg takes the oath of office becoming the 2nd woman justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

    2003 

    The United Kingdom tops 100°F for the first time in recorded history.

    Henri Nestlé – 1814

    As a pharmacist, Nestlé had the training and understanding to experiment with products. Before becoming a chocolatier, he created milk products for infants. Today, his brand is one of the most recognizable around the world.

    Eliza Frances Andrews – 1840

    As a Southern author who lived through the Civil War, Andrews offers a glimpse into the world of women in the south after the war. She also was a recognized botanist. Some of her books include A Family Secret, The Wartime Journal of a Georgia Girl and A Practical Course in Botany.

    Hugo Eckner -1868

    The pilot of the Graf Zeppelin, Eckener would set records around the world with the lighter-than-air-ship.

    Herbert Hoover – 1874

    Serving as the 31st President of the United States, Hoover took office at the beginning of the Great Depression.

    Jack Haley – 1898

    Best known for his role as the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz, Haley began his career as a vaudeville actor.

    Leo Fender – 1909

    The musical innovator, Leo Fender, didn’t even play guitar. However, his name and brand continue to influence the electric guitar world, today.

    Buddy Lewis – 1916

    Born John Kelly Lewis, he played for the Washington Senators for 14 years. The third baseman and right fielder made two All-Star appearances during his career.

    Jimmy Dean – 1928

    The talented country singer and actor would also launch a brand of sausage enjoyed by millions.

    James Reynolds – 1946

    Best known for his role as Abe Carver on Days of Our Lives. He was cast in the role in 1981 and has played it ever since.

    Michael Gerard Bauer – 1955

    Children and young adult author, Michael Gerard Bauer, began his career as a teacher. He published his first book, Running Man, in 2004.

    Antonio Banderas – 1960

    The Spanish actor made is American debut in the film The Mambo Kings in 1992. Since then his roles have brought him international attention.

    Suzanne Collins – 1962

    Best known for The Hunger Games series, the author began her career writing for children’s television.

    Josh Gates – 1972

    International globe trekker and television host of Expedition Unknown, Gates is also an author.

    Wade Barrett – 1980

    The English WWE wrestler was born Stuart Alexander Bennett. Following his 12-year wrestling career, Bennett went on to commentating.

    Andrew Drummond – 1993

    As a first round draft pick for the Detroit Pistons in 2012, Drummond went on to play center for the Cleveland Cavaliers.

  • NATIONAL SOURDOUGH BREAD DAY – April 1

     

    NATIONAL SOURDOUGH BREAD DAY – April 1

    NATIONAL SOURDOUGH BREAD DAY

    National Sourdough Bread Day on April 1st recognizes one of the world’s oldest leavened breads. 

    Sourdough is produced through the process of long fermentation of the dough using lactobacilli and yeasts. The use of naturally occurring yeasts and friendly bacteria versus cultivated yeast causes the bread to have a slightly sour, but pleasant taste. 

    Most likely the first form of leavening available to bakers, it is believed sourdough originated in Ancient Egyptian times around 1500 BC. During the European Middle Ages, it also remained the usual form of leavening.

    As part of the California Gold Rush, sourdough was the principal bread made in Northern California and is still a part of the culture of San Francisco today. The bread was so common at that time the word “sourdough” became a nickname for the gold prospectors. In The Yukon and Alaska, a “sourdough” is also a nickname given to someone who has spent an entire winter north of the Arctic Circle. It refers to their tradition of protecting their sourdough during the coldest months by keeping it close to their body. The sourdough tradition was also carried into Alaska and western Canadian territories during the Klondike Gold Rush.

    San Francisco sourdough is the most famous sourdough bread made in the United States today. In contrast to sourdough production in other areas of the country, the San Francisco variety has remained in continuous production since 1849, with some bakeries able to trace their starters back to California’s Gold Rush period. Many restaurant chains keep it as a menu staple. Sourdough bread is a great side to your soup, stew or toasted with your morning cereal.

    HOW TO OBSERVE #SourdoughBreadDay

    • Bake some homemade sourdough bread.
    • Share a recipe or order some from your favorite bakery.
    • Celebrate by tagging them and letting them know how much you appreciate them.
    • We also have a recipe for you to enjoy: San Francisco Sourdough Bread recipe.
    • Use #SourdoughBreadDay to post on social media.

    NATIONAL SOURDOUGH BREAD DAY HISTORY

    National Day Calendar continues researching the origins of this delicious food holiday. 

    Sourdough FAQ

    Q. Can I make a sourdough starter at home?
    A. Yes. Sourdough started doesn’t require many ingredients – just water and flour. It’s the method that gets the yeast forming for delicious sourdough bread.

    Q. Can I freeze sourdough starter if I don’t have time to feed it?
    A. Yes! That’s the beauty of sourdough. The yeast will go into hibernation while frozen, but when you thaw it and begin to feed it again, it will grow and continue to thrive.

    Q. How can I change up my sourdough for something a little different?
    A. Try adding nuts, seeds, spices, cheese, or vegetable juices to your sourdough. There are many different recipes to try, so it’s easy to get creative.

    April 1st Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

    1957

    Panorama, a BBC television programme, runs a segment on the Swiss spaghetti harvest.

    1959

    NASA selects its first seven astronauts who become known as the Mercury 7.

    They included Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn, Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan Shepard, and Deke Slayton. Of the seven, Alan Shepard would be the first American in space. John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth. Gus Grissom would die tragically with two other astronauts (Ed White and Roger Chaffee) when a fire erupted during a pre-launch test for the first manned Apollo 1 flight. They were the first casualties of the NASA space program.

    1970

    American Motors releases the first Gremlin off the assembly line.

    1978

    Australian millionaire Dick Smith towed what appeared to be a giant iceberg into Sydney Harbor. It was an accomplishment he had been promising to do for months and now he had. It was also time to chip off chunks and fill everyone’s drinks. Well, until his prank was revealed by a sudden rain that washed away fire suppression foam and shaving foam showing a small wooden mountain draped with plastic sheeting loaded on the barge.

    1996

    The Taco Liberty Bell and other patriotic businesses wipe out National Debt. Or that’s what the headlines would have read if their April Fool’s prank had gotten carried away. Their full-page ads informed the public that the fast-food chain had purchased the national treasure to offset our nation’s debt and encouraged other businesses to do the same.

    2019

    National Day Calendar releases an article about the successful production of yolkless eggs.

    April 1st Celebrated (and Not So Celebrated) History

    Sergei Rachmaninoff – 1873

    The Russian pianist and composer produced immensely moving music like his 1901 Piano Concerto No. 2. In 1917, the Russian Revolution drove him and his family out of the country. He eventually settled in the United States where he continued playing and composing until his death in 1948.

    Lon Chaney – 1883

    Known as the “Man of a Thousand Faces,” Lon Chaney literally transformed how we perceive cinema. The actor, make-up artist, and director’s pioneering work set the stage for magnificent and compelling artistry and technique. Chaney’s influence is still felt throughout the industry today.

    Florence Blanchfield – 1884

    Florence Blanchfield was the first Army nurse to be granted a regular Army commission. She joined in 1917 and served during World Wars I and II. Her efforts brought about equality in pay and rank to women in the Army and Navy.

    Alberta Hunter – 1895

    The internationally known jazz and blues singer hung up her microphone in 1954 and pursued a career in practical nursing. Following graduation, Hunter continued her nursing career until 1977 when she picked up her microphone once more.

    Anne McCaffrey – 1926

    The American Irish writer is best known for her science fiction work, especially her Dragonriders of Pern series. She is a science fiction writer of firsts, becoming the first woman to win both the Hugo Award (1968) and the Nebula Award (1969).

    Notable Mentions

    Otto Von Bismarck – 1815
    Ernest Barnes – 1874
    James Lee Dozier – 1931
    Debbie Reynolds – 1932
    Gil Scott Heron – 1949
    Susan Boyle – 1961