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NOVEMBER 9, 2018 | NATIONAL SCRAPPLE DAY | MICROTIA AWARENESS DAY | NATIONAL LOUISIANA DAY

National Scrapple Day - November 9
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NATIONAL SCRAPPLE DAY

National Scrapple Day is observed annually on November 9th. Scrapple is arguably the first pork food invented in America. For those who are not familiar with scrapple, which is also known by the Pennsylvania Dutch name “pon haus,“ it is traditionally a mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal, wheat flour and spices.  (The spices may include but are not limited to sage, thyme, savory and black pepper.)  The mush is then formed into a semi-solid loaf, sliced and pan-fried.

The immediate ancestor of scrapple was the Low German dish called panhas, which was adapted to make use of locally available ingredients and, in parts of Pennsylvania, it is still called Pannhaas, panhoss, ponhoss or pannhas.

It was in the 17th and 18th centuries that the first recipes for scrapple were created by Dutch colonists who settled near Philadelphia and Chester County, Pennsylvania.   Hence the origin of its discovery, it is strongly associated with rural areas surrounding Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington D.C., eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, eastern Virginia and the Delmarva Peninsula.

  • Scrapple can be found in supermarkets throughout the area in both refrigerated and frozen cases.
  • Home recipes for beef, chicken and turkey scrapple are available.
  • Scrapple is sometimes deep-fried or broiled instead of pan frying.
  • Scrapple is typically eaten as a breakfast side dish.
  • Condiments are sometimes served with scrapple, some of which include apple butter, ketchup, jelly, maple syrup, honey, horseradish or mustard.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Have some scrapple. Following are a few scrapple recipes for you to try:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/scrapple/
http://www.cooks.com/recipe/pt6o151m/scrapple.html
http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/359/ChickenScrapple61687.shtml

Use #NationalScrappleDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator and the origin of National Scrapple Day.

Microtia Awareness Day - November 9
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MICROTIA AWARENESS DAY

November 9th is dedicated to spreading hope and knowledge concerning a congenital birth defect, which derives its name from the Latin terms for little ears. Mark the calendar for Microtia Awareness Day for November 9th and think of the number 9 as the shape of an ear.

Approximately one child in every 9,000 is born with Microtia (when the ear(s) do not fully develop during the 1st trimester of pregnancy).  Often affecting one ear or both ears, Microtia is diagnosed at birth, but there is no understanding as to why Microtia occurs. Facial challenges, hearing loss and the longing for social acceptance are some of the daily concerns for those who are born with Microtia.

For most parents, the day of their child’s birth turns from celebration to concern and uncertainty.  Initially, aside from the arrival of their beautiful new baby, they notice the outward signs of the condition – a small, curiously shaped ear or no ear at all.  Depending on where these families live, doctors and nurses may be well versed in the condition and quickly educate and prepare parents, reassuring them. In others regions, the condition is rare enough that misinformation or lack of information quickly evaporates any remaining sense of celebration that accompanies a birth. Often when answers aren’t forthcoming, hopes and dreams become overshadowed by unnecessary challenges to a joyous occasion. There are options and support! It is the intention of Microtia Awareness Day to help promote public awareness and the hope that future generations of families will leave the hospital armed with more answers than questions and their dreams for their child intact.

Children are born into this world not knowing they are any different from anyone else. Many with Microtia share similar stories of curious stares, bullying, or awkwardness.  Individual personalities, social conditioning, available treatments and bullying all impact how every child develops and copes as an adult.  By removing unnecessary boundaries and replacing them with resources, tools, and support, we can eliminate bullying and clear the way for an even more successful future.

In addition to self-acceptance and loving oneself, advancements in technology can improve the lives of those with Microtia. From hearing aids and implants to surgical procedures and bio-ears that create new outer ears, all these improvements require research.  Research requires time, trials and support. Even the untapped potential of 3-D printing is promising!

Those with Microtia are an amazing community of people.  Their stories repeatedly tell that with and without technology, medical procedures or innovative research, the most significant advancement of all is human support, awareness, and acceptance.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #MicrotiaAwarenessDay to share on social media.

HISTORY

The Ear Community Organization

founded Microtia Awareness Day in 2016 and was submitted by the Tumblin family. Melissa Tumblin founded Ear Community in 2010 after stumbling through the hurdles and challenges of finding answers for her daughter when she was born with Microtia. Since then, Ear Community has brought over 6,500 people together from around the world at the organization’s events making it possible to share experiences and resources. The community is made up of not only children and adults with Microtia and their families, but teachers, advocates, and medical professionals from around the world who foster awareness and assistance for this amazing group of people. Board members either have the condition or a family member who does, so they have close personal experience with the obstacles from a myriad of perspectives. The Registrar at National Day Calendar approved Microtia Awareness Day in October.

 

 

National Louisiana Day - November 9
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NATIONAL LOUISIANA DAY

On November 9, National Louisiana Day recognizes the state that brought us such treasures as Jazz, Creole and American Mardi Gras.

Throughout the history of the state, the blending of race and culture have resulted in the Delta’s own unique flair that brings visitors from around the world seeking to taste their food, hear their music and see their style.

When French explorers first arrived, several diverse tribes populated the area. Many of their population were decimated by disease and war. Natchez, Choctaw or Chitimacha descendants still survive today.

In 1803, Louisiana became territory when the United States completed negotiations with France for the 828,000 mile Louisiana Purchase. The first of 15 states to be carved out of the region, Louisianna entered the United States in 1812.

Within its mysterious gulf, Louisiana holds the secrets of pirates, conflicts of slavery and the paths of progress.  The bayou teems with life and stories untold.

Louisiana epitomizes the phrase “melting pot” probably more than any other state. Throughout the history of the state, Native American, French, Spanish, German, African, Irish and Caribean cultures have blended in a variety of ways creating a diverse and distinct culture in the bayou. From the food to the language, the music and history, Cajun (French Canadian or Acadian), Creole (European, African, Caribbean or Spanish mixed ancestry) and even the landscape impact the enchantment that is Louisiana.

HOW TO OBSERVE

On November 9, join National Day Calendar as we celebrate Louisiana’s treasures and mysteries. Uncover hidden the hidden gulf coast and find all the adventures Louisiana has to offer! Use #NationalLouisianaDay to share on social media.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar™ is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months.  In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.
 
Whether you want to celebrate your favorite mail carrier and flip flops, share your joy for bacon and chocolate cake or enjoy popcorn (our office favorite) on National Popcorn Day, stay in-the-know by signing-up for our e-mail updates, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Don’t find yourself unprepared on Talk Like a Pirate Day or Answer the Phone Like Buddy the Elf Day – join us as we #CelebrateEveryDay!

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