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AUGUST 11, 2018 | NATIONAL SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S DAY | NATIONAL GARAGE SALE DAY | NATIONAL BOWLING DAY | NATIONAL RASPBERRY BOMBE DAY | NATIONAL PRESIDENTIAL JOKE DAY

NATIONAL SON’S AND DAUGHTER’S DAY

Each year on August 11, parents across the United States participate in National Son’s and Daughter’s Day.  On this day, spend time with the joys of your life.

Let your children know that you are glad they are part of your life.  Share family stories, listen to the events of their day, their hopes, and dreams. Enjoy every day you have with them and spend as much quality time as you can. 

HOW TO OBSERVE

Do something special for your children today.  If they are at home, go for a walk or enjoy a local park.  If your children are grown, give them a call and remind them how special they are to you.  Use #SonsAndDaughtersDay on social media.

HISTORY

Our research did not find the creator or the origin of National Son’s and Daughter’s Day.

NATIONAL GARAGE SALE DAY

Saturdays and Summertime are the perfect combinations for garage sales.  That is why the second Saturday in August is designated National Garage Sale Day.

On this day, you will see people finding great deals at these neighborhood sales.  For those having the sales, this is a way for them to find new homes for items they no longer need.

HOW TO OBSERVE

If you see a driveway full of items and a sale sign out, stop by and celebrate National Garage Sale Day. Use #NationalGarageSaleDay to share your great deals on social media.

HISTORY

C. Daniel Rhodes of Alabama came up with the idea of having a National Garage Sale Day in 2001 after seeing neighbors having sales on different weekends.  Rhodes thought it would be more convenient if they all had them on the same weekend. He is also the founder of Mulligan Day and Brother’s Day.

NATIONAL BOWLING DAY

National Bowling Day is observed annually on the second Saturday in August.

While it is possible that bowling style games existed in ancient civilizations around the world, we likely owe the modern game of bowling to the land of Germany. Kegels were used much like batons for protection or sport. They would place them at the end of an alley and roll a stone, attempting to knock them down. It was believed that by knocking down the kegel, their sins would be forgiven.

Other lawn games such as bocce and petanque may also be precursors to bowling. American literature’s first mention of ninepins is in Washington Irving’s Rip Van Winkle. Bowling, like many sports, was fodder for gambling and often came under scrutiny. In 1841, Connecticut passed a law prohibiting ninepin bowling alleys. Circumventing the law, alleys added one pin to the line-up. Very little about the game has changed since.

In 1905, the first rubber compound bowling ball was introduced. Wooden balls made of “lignum vitae” were used up until then, but this modern ball launched a whole new era of bowling.

Bowling was featured as a demonstration sport in 1988’s Summer Olympics in Seoul, Korea.  However, it has never returned to the Olympics.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Gather a group of friends and family and go bowling together. Use #NationalBowlingDay to post on social media and alert others.

HISTORY

The Bowling Proprietors’ Association of America, Inc. sponsored the first National Bowling Day in association with the General Cigar Company and NBC-TV in 1956. It was the accumulation of hundreds of bowling tournaments in 48 states attracting millions of bowlers across the country raising money for the American Red Cross. The televised Final Bowl Off was held on National Bowling Day on October 14, 1956, in Macon County, Illinois and featured bowling stars Bill Lilian and Anita Cantaline of Detroit.

The event was never repeated, but National Bowling Day traditions have started once more. Continuing in the same spirit as the 1956 event, the modern era National Bowling Day takes care of others while taking down those pins. One example is the Million Pin Challenge.  Donations will help provide half a million meals to Feeding America to fight domestic hunger.

NATIONAL RASPBERRY BOMBE DAY

National Raspberry Bombe Day is observed annually on August 11th.  This frozen summer delight is sure to please your taste buds and be a great finale to your meal.

A typical bombe contains sherbet, heavy cream, sugar, chopped nuts, candied fruit and a dash of rum.  It is layered in a spherical mold and frozen overnight creating a centerpiece dessert.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Enjoy our tried and true raspberry bombe recipe.  Use #RaspberryBombeDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator or the origin of Raspberry Bombe Day.

NATIONAL PRESIDENTIAL JOKE DAY

National Presidential Joke Day is observed annually on August 11.

A day to recognize the humor often found and yet not so appreciated in the highest office in the land, National Presidental Day offers a nod to the gaffes, social missteps and sometimes downright hilarious mistakes presidents make. During an election year, the scrutiny of the constituency can be brutal; the presidential candidates should be prepared to handle the presidential joke.  The citizenry will be listening!

HOW TO OBSERVE

Of all your presidential memories and history lessons what is your favorite presidential joke? Use #PresidentialJokeDay to share on social media.

HISTORY

National Presidential Joke Day began on August 11, 1984. During a sound check for his Saturday evening radio broadcast, President Ronald Reagan joked, “My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever.  We begin bombing in five minutes.” Since 1982, the networks had agreed comments made during sound checks were off the record.  However, it was leaked to the general public and CBS eventually broadcast the recording on its Monday evening report.  Critics blasted Reagan as being unpresidential, and others considered the joke harmless under most circumstances.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar™ is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months.  In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.
 
Whether you want to celebrate your favorite mail carrier and flip flops, share your joy for bacon and chocolate cake or enjoy popcorn (our office favorite) on National Popcorn Day, stay in-the-know by signing-up for our e-mail updates, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Don’t find yourself unprepared on Talk Like a Pirate Day or Answer the Phone Like Buddy the Elf Day – join us as we #CelebrateEveryDay!

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