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SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 | NATIONAL PEANUT DAY | UNCLE SAM DAY | NATIONAL KIDS TAKE OVER THE KITCHEN DAY

National Peanut Day September 13
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NATIONAL PEANUT DAY

On September 13 National Peanut Day pays homage to mighty and tasty peanut.

Likely originating in South America around 3,500 years ago, this legume is not a nut. They grow underground like potatoes. Since they are an edible seed that forms in a pod, they belong to the family Leguminosae with peas and beans. When it comes to plants packing protein power, peanuts provide a whopping 8 grams per ounce, more than any other nut according to The Peanut Institute. And remember, it’s not a nut! Nuts grow on trees.

The peanut is also high in antioxidants. Not only are peanuts high in necessary nutrients such as vitamin E, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, B6, iron, selenium, zinc and many others, but when paired with other nutrient-rich foods, studies have shown this amazing legume helps us absorb nutrients better.

For the longest time, livestock gained the greatest benefit from all these nutrients. Until modern methods came along, planting and harvesting peanuts were a labor intensive and risky endeavors for farmers.Gradually their popularity grew. From Civil War soldiers who found a fondness for them to PT Barnum’s traveling circus. But what made it possible for peanuts to be grown in abundance was an advancement in farm technology. Just like the cotton gin revolutionized the cotton industry, planters and harvesters transformed not only the peanut farm but farming the world over.

Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack ~ lyric from Take Me Out to the Ballgame(1908) by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer.

With the rise in peanut production, there also brought an increase of curious investigation into its possible uses. When the boll weevil wreaked havoc on the South’s cotton crop, Dr. George Washington Carver, who had already been researching this amazing groundnut, suggested farmers diversify into peanuts. It was an economic boon to Southern farmers.  He published his research “How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it for Human Consumption” in 1916. His continued research resulted in more than delicious uses for this goober, groundnut or ground pea. From shaving cream to plastics and cosmetics and even coffee, Dr. Carver’s appetite for the peanut seemed to be unending.

Many of the peanut discoveries Dr. Carver made 100 years ago are still being used today.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Explore the world of the peanut and crack open some for a healthful snack. Use #NationalPeanutDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of National Peanut Day.

UNCLE SAM DAY

The man behind the iconic image and fascinating nickname for the United States government is recognized on Uncle Sam Day, born on September 13, 1766.

Sam Wilson, a meatpacker from New York, supplied barrels of meat to soldiers during the war of 1812.  To identify the meat for shipment, Wilson prominently stamped “U.S.” on the barrels.  It wasn’t long before the soldiers dubbed the grub a delivery from Uncle Sam.  As such nicknames tend to do, its popularity spread.

The first illustration of Uncle Sam is unlike the one we know today.  Published by Harper’s Weekly in 1861, the young government representative (a starred bandana on his head and wearing a striped vest)  is depicted dividing up Virginia like a butcher. The image of Uncle Sam would take many forms over the years.

Credit is given to German-born illustrator and cartoonist Thomas Nast for developing the long-legged Uncle Sam with the starred top hat and striped pants who is more like the one we know today.  The Harper’s Weekly political cartoonist took on many issues with his Uncle Sam character including Boss Tweed, Union recruitment, and Reconstruction.

During the modern era, Uncle Sam obtained some color.  The United States Army awarded Montgomery Flagg with the artwork for the familiar portrait used in the “I Want You For The U.S. Army” campaign during World War I.  It first appeared on the cover of Leslie’s Weekly, an illustrated literary and news magazine.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #UncleSamDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

President George H. W. Bush proclaimed Uncle Sam Day to be September 13, 1989, in honor of the anniversary of the birth of Samuel Wilson.  It coincided with the bicentennial celebration of the City of Troy, New York where Wilson lived and worked.  The City of Troy requested the designation of the President.

On September 7, 1961, through concurrent resolutions, Congress officially named Uncle Sam a permanent symbol of American strength and idealism.

National Kids Take Over The Kitchen Day September 13
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NATIONAL KIDS TAKE OVER THE KITCHEN DAY

National Kids Take Over The Kitchen Day is observed annually on September 13th.

Kids and teens across the country are called to take over their kitchens on this day using their favorite recipes and make a meal for their family!  (Adult supervision and assistance as required for the younger bakers and chefs in the house!)

The objective of this mission of the Young Chefs Academy (YCA) is to empower kids and teens to become more actively involved in the planning, preparation, and cooking of meals.  The YCA is fostering family bonds and actively fighting the battle against the many serious health and social issues related to youth’s eating habits in today’s time.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Let the kids cook for a change of pace. Try one of these kid-friendly recipes to get your children cooking!

Herbed Chicken Nuggets
Yogurt Sundaes
Use #KidsTakeOverTheKitchenDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

National Kids Take Over The Kitchen Day is sponsored by the Young Chefs Academy.

About National Day Calendar

National Day Calendar™ is the authoritative source for fun, unusual and unique National Days! Since our humble beginnings on National Popcorn Day in 2013, we now track nearly 1,500 National Days, National Weeks and National Months.  In addition, our research team continues to uncover the origins of existing National Days as well as discover new, exciting days for everyone to celebrate.
 
Whether you want to celebrate your favorite mail carrier and flip flops, share your joy for bacon and chocolate cake or enjoy our office favorite Colorado Jack Popcorn on National Popcorn Day, stay in-the-know by signing-up for our e-mail updates, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Don’t find yourself unprepared for Talk Like a Pirate Day or Answer the Phone Like Buddy the Elf Day – join us as we #CelebrateEveryDay!

Be like Cal!
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