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FEBRUARY 28, 2014 – NATIONAL TOOTH FAIRY DAY – NATIONAL CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE DAY – RARE DISEASE DAY USA

28 Feb

  Cute-Tooth-Fairy.png                                                   

NATIONAL TOOTH FAIRY DAY   

A very fun holiday, which is National Tooth Fairy Day, is celebrated each year on February 28th and also on August 22nd.

The tooth fairy is one of the favorite fantasy figures of our early childhood years.  Folklore stories state that when a child loses a baby tooth, if he or she places the tooth under their pillow, the tooth fairy will then come to visit while the child is sleeping, replacing the lost baby tooth with a gift (usually money).

If the tooth has been lost, they need not worry, the tooth fairy will still visit if a note of explanation is left under the pillow in place of the tooth!

A 2013 survey conducted by Visa Inc. indicates that American children receive an average of $3.70 per tooth. 

In early Europe, the tradition was to bury the baby teeth that had fallen out.  When the sixth tooth falls out, the child’s parents then slip a gift of money from the tooth fairy under their child’s pillow, leaving the tooth as a reward.  Many of the parents will leave a trail of glitter on the floor, which represents fairy dust. 

The tradition in Northern Europe was to pay a tann-te or tooth fee when a child lost their first tooth. This tradition can be found recorded in writings in the earliest written record of Norse and Northern European traditions.

Unlike Santa Claus, there are few details of the tooth fairy’s appearance that are consistent in the various versions of the myth.   A children’s books and artwork review found the tooth fairy to be depicted as the following:  a child with wings, a pixie, a dragon, a blue mother-figure, a flying ballerina, two little old men, a dental hygienist, a pot bellied flying man smoking a cigar, a hat, a bear and others. 

Rosemary Wells conducted a study in 1984 revealing that 74 percent of those surveyed believed the tooth fairy to be female, while 12 percent believed the tooth fairy to be neither male nor female and 8 percent believed the tooth fairy could be either male or female.  When Wells was asked about her finding regarding the appearance of the tooth fairy, she explained: “You’ve got your basic Tinkerbell-type tooth fairy with the wings, wand, a little older and whatnot.  Then you have some people who think of the tooth fairy as a man or a bunny rabbit or a mouse.”  

Research has found that the belief in the tooth fairy may provide comfort to children experiencing fear or pain resulting from the loss of a tooth. 

Author Vicki Lansky advises parents to tell their children, at a young age, that the tooth fairy pays much more for a perfect tooth than for a decayed one.  It has been said that some families leave notes with the payment, praising the child for their good dental habits.

NATIONAL TOOTH FAIRY DAY HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of National Tooth Fairy Day, an “unofficial” national holiday.    National Tooth Fairy Day – Feb. 28th and Aug 22nd.

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HAVE A GREAT DAY!!

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NATIONAL CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE DAY

A delightfully delicious dessert is celebrated each year on February 28th as it is National Chocolate Souffle Day.

The word souffle is the past participle of the French verb souffler, which means “to blow up” or more loosely “puff up”, which describes a souffle perfectly.   A souffle is a lightly baked cake made with egg yolks and the beaten eggs whites that are combined with various other ingredients.   Souffle can be found served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert.

There are two basic components that make up every souffle.

  • 1.  a French creme patisserie base/flavored cream sauce or puree
  • 2.  egg whites beaten to a  soft peak meringue

The flavor is provided by the base and the “lift” is provided by the beaten egg whites.  There are certain foods that are commonly used for the base in a souffle which include cheese, jam, fruits, berries, chocolate, banana  and lemon.   Many souffle bakers like to puncture the top of the souffle, after it is removed from the oven, and pour various types of liquid sauces onto it, such as chocolate or vanilla.

To celebrate today’s food holiday, try one of the following “tried and true” recipes:

http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/heavenly-chocolate-souffle-cake/c452719f-f5e9-4642-a484-5199d38464ce

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Mexican-Chocolate-Souffle-Cakes-4644

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/flourless-chocolate-souffle-with-raspberry-cream-recipe.html

Have a great National Chocolate Souffle Day!

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE DAY HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of National Chocolate Souffle Day, an “unofficial” national holiday.

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RARE DISEASE DAY USA

Rare Disease Day is recognized each year on the last day in February.

First observed in Europe in 2008, Rare Disease Day was established by Eurordis, (the European Rare Disease Organization).  In 2009, NORD was asked by EURORDIS  to sponsor Rare Disease Day in the United States.  NORD accepted and 2014 celebrates the 6th annual RARE DISEASE DAY USA.

The goal of Rare Disease Day is to raise awareness amongst the general public and decision makers about rare diseases and the impact that they have on patients’ lives.

For more information see: 

http://rarediseaseday.us/
and
http://www.rarediseaseday.org/ 

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RESOURCES:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tooth_fairy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souffle

http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/National_Symbols/American_Hollidays.html

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4 Responses to “FEBRUARY 28, 2014 – NATIONAL TOOTH FAIRY DAY – NATIONAL CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE DAY – RARE DISEASE DAY USA”

  1. Facebook August 4, 2014 at 11:02 pm #

    Great article.

  2. rhodyart February 28, 2014 at 7:03 am #

    could you possibly post the March calendar on your site? I like to post them on FB via hootsuite and I like to schedule them far in advance. Having the list would be really helpful thanks lin

    ######################## Lin Collette

    lincolletteri@outlook.com

    rhodyart.etsy.com

    http://www.Facebook.com/rhodyart

    http://www.pinterest.com/rhodyart

    http://www.twitter.com/rhodyart

    Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 09:05:58 +0000 To: lincolletteri@outlook.com

    • marloanderson March 7, 2014 at 9:38 pm #

      Thank you for your interest in National Day Calendar. The month has been updated. Since you are listing we would appreciate the occasional link to your source.

      Thanks

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. National Tooth Fairy Day | The Daily Grid - February 28, 2014

    […] Punchbowl, National Day Calendar, Examiner.com, […]

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